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Thursday, March 22
 

5:00pm

Opening Reception and Screening of Esperanza Spalding’s Radio Music Society Short Films

(Two short blocks South of The Kimmel Center, between Thompson and Sullivan Streets)

Light Hors D'oeurves provided / Cash Bar

About the short films:

Eleven of the twelve songs on Esperanza’s  Spalding’s latest release, Radio Music Society, are accompanied by conceptual short films, which further express Esperanza’s inspiration and story behind each track. Shot in various locations including New York City; Barcelona, Spain; and Portland, Oregon; all films will be available to purchasers as a digital download or on a DVD in the deluxe version.

Venue phone #: 212 353 3474

lepoissonrouge.com



Thursday March 22, 2012 5:00pm - 6:30pm
(Le) Poisson Rouge 158 Bleecker Street, New York, NY 10012

5:00pm

Registration

Thursday March 22, 2012 5:00pm - 7:00pm
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

7:00pm

Conference Opening Keynote: The Artist in the City
with Angelique Kidjo, Esperanza Spalding, Santigold, and Heems

Writing about how jazz in the mid-20th century reflected lived experience in New York city’s tenements, the scholar Shane Vogel quoted Duke Ellington’s description of his swing symphony, Harlem Air Shaft


“So much goes on in a Harlem air shaft...You hear fights, you smell dinner, you hear people making love. You hear intimate gossip floating down. You hear the radio. An air shaft is one great big loudspeaker.” In the crowded city, the musician-composer becomes a living receiver, distilling a static field of sounds and sensations into an evocative whole."

This keynote event gathers together four prominent artists whose work reflects a cosmopolitan worldview, with each artist rooted in his or her particular urban home.

Grammy winning Beninoise singer-songwriter Angelique Kidjo has truly had a global career, having recorded albums in a staggering array of languages, styles, genres and cities. Her recently-released live album Spirit Rising is a career retrospective featuring diverse guests like Ezra Koenig, Josh Groban and the Kuumba Singers.

Grammy winner Esperanza Spalding is about to release her third album, Radio Music Society, a border-crossing blend of jazz, soul, funk and pop that reflects the cities she loves: New York, Barcelona, and her birthplace of Portland, Oregon.

Philadelphia-bred, Brooklyn-based Santigold (Santi White) is one of the brightest lights of the East Coast bohemian underground; her upcoming second album, Master of My Make Believe, takes her incendiary blend of hip hop, indie rock and dance music to a new level.

On his recent mixtape Nehru Jackets, Himanshu Suri (Heems) of the Queens-identified hip hop group Das Racist drops wit and wisdom about the ups and downs of life in Gotham’s five boroughs. Discussing their new work and how they’ve formed their own sound and vision in relationship to the urban spaces where they thrive, these artists consider what’s changed and what remains consistent in the half-century plus since the Duke found heaven in the clanging multiplicity of the air shaft.

Moderated by: Ann Powers

 

www.esperanzaspalding.com

www.santigold.com

www.dasracist.com

www.angeliquekidjo.com

 


Speakers
avatar for Santigold

Santigold

Santigold is Santi White: an artist whose perseverance relies on invention, a champion who survives off her own skill and faith. She is a major muse watched by the inspired world, an in categorical performer who collapses time and genre with one hand guided by tradition, while the other hand carves out a shining future. Santigold is neither calm nor mayhem, but from her lungs burst every color in between. After four years of hide and seek... Read More →
avatar for Himanshu Suri aka Heems

Himanshu Suri aka Heems

Himanshu Suri (aka Heems) grew up in Queens, New York, a borough that still figures strongly in his creative palette. After studying economics and South Asian studies at Wesleyan University, he formed the hip hop group Das Racist with fellow rapper Victor Vazquez and hype man Ashok Kondabolu. Das Racist has gained critical and popular attention with its mixtapes Shut Up,Dude, and Sit Down, Man, and released its official debut album, Relax, in... Read More →
avatar for Angelique Kidjo

Angelique Kidjo

Angelique Kidjo offers a banquet of rare musical treats in her new Razor & Tie album, Spirit Rising.  Recorded in Boston during a PBS concert at station WGBH, it showcases Kidjo amid a line of special guests that includes Josh Groban, Dianne Reeves, Branford Marsalis and Ezra Koenig.  Angelique’s prior associations with Groban, Reeves and Marsalis have already produced some memorable results.  And the presence of... Read More →
AP

Ann Powers

Ann Powers is a critic for NPR Music and author of the books Tori Amos: Piece by Piece (with the artist) and Weird Like Us: My Bohemian America.   Abstract: | | "'Free Your Head': Psychedelic Rock's Erotic Cities" Between 1967 and 1969, the youth of America created a floating polis that reshaped the rules of conventional society. Much has been written about the counterculture’s politics, its fashions, its music and its mores... Read More →
avatar for Esperanza Spalding

Esperanza Spalding

Esperanza Spalding, a bassist/vocalist/composer, was one of the biggest breakout stars of 2011—not just in jazz, but in all genres of music. Her receipt of the 2011 Grammy for Best New Artist was unprecedented—the first time a jazz musician had won the award. Her albums include Junjo, Esperanza, and Chamber Music Society. Spalding’s latest release, Radio Music Society, includes, among many others, jazz legends Joe Lovano, Jack... Read More →


Thursday March 22, 2012 7:00pm - 8:30pm
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012
 
Friday, March 23
 

8:00am

Book Display

Books display (and coffee for participants) throughout day


Friday March 23, 2012 8:00am - 5:00pm
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

8:00am

Registration

Friday March 23, 2012 8:00am - 5:00pm
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

9:00am

K-Pop

Jeffrey Kim, Erin Cho, and Seung K. Yang, “Fashioning the Wave of K-Pop beyond Asia through Transnational Communities”

Myoung-Sun (Kelly) Song, “The S(e)oul of Hip-Hop: Searching for the Meaning of Hip-Hop in South Korea”

Joshua Takano Chambers-Letson, “Mare Liberum (The Free Sea) in Karen O’s Native Korean Rock”

Chris Randle, “Driving Freely Through the World:
Cosmopolitanism in K-pop”

Moderator: Hua Hsu


Speakers
JT

Joshua Takano Chambers-Letson

Joshua Takano Chambers-Letson is Assistant Professor in the Department of Performance at Northwestern University. He has published articles in JPMS, MELUS, TDR, Women & Performance, and Criticism. His book project, A Race So Different: The Making of Asian Americans in Performance and Law, is under contract with NYU Press.   "Mare Liberum (The Free Sea) in Karen O's Native Korean Rock" Karen O is a rock musician of Polish-American... Read More →
EC

Erin Cho

Erin Cho is an Associate Professor at Parsons New School, New York. Erin’s main research interests include Design marketing and Strategic management of Cultural products.   Abstract: | | "Fashioning the Wave of K-Pop beyond Asia through Transnational Communities" This paper explores the rise of Korean creative industries, notably K-Pop, and how K-Pop have been in fashion, first across, and then beyond, Asian markets into... Read More →
HH

Hua Hsu

Hua Hsu teaches in the English Department at Vassar College. His work has appeared in Artforum, the Atlantic, the New York Times and Slate. He is a columnist for The Wire (UK) and a staff writer at Grantland. He is finishing his first book, A Floating Chinaman. He was a member of the 2012 EMP-IASPM conference planning committee.
JK

Jeffrey Kim

Jeffrey Kim is Professor at SKKU in Korea and Research Fellow at University of London. His works on pop music since 1996 has been presented and published in a number of leading international conferences and academic journals including ACA/PCA, SCMS, Academy of Management, Academy of International Business, Strategic management Society. He has advised Korean Ministry of Culture in the Cultural Policy concerning Music industry.   Abstract... Read More →
CR

Chris Randle

Chris Randle is the culture editor at the Toronto Standard and a freelance writer who has contributed to The Globe and Mail, the National Post, The Comics Journal, Social Text, Popdust and the Awl. He blogs at Backtotheworld.net, tweets as @randlechris and compulsively screencaps at beautravail.tumblr.com.   Abstract: | | "Driving Freely Through the World: Cosmopolitanism in K-pop" Last summer, after being mobbed by Parisian superfans, a... Read More →
MK

Myoung-Sun (Kelly) Song

Myoung-Sun (Kelly) Song is a doctoral student at USC Annenberg School of Communication & Journalism, where she studies the visual communication of images in popular culture. She holds a B.A. in English Literature & M.A. in Professional Writing from Ewha Womans University. She has also presented a paper comparing the images of women in American and Korean mainstream rap music videos.   Abstract: | | "The S(e)oul of Hip-Hop... Read More →
SK

Seung K. Yang

Seung K. Yang is a manager at Kyounggi Digital Content Institute, a government body specializing in the promotion of digital content locally and globally. Seung K. was a Composer/Vocalist/Guitarist in a band that released two albums.   Abstract: | | "Fashioning the Wave of K-Pop beyond Asia through Transnational Communities" This paper explores the rise of Korean creative industries, notably K-Pop, and how K-Pop have been in fashion... Read More →


Friday March 23, 2012 9:00am - 11:00am
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

9:00am

Sonic Contestation

Patrick Deer, “‘The Cassette Played Poptones’: Punk’s Pop Embrace
of the City in Ruins”

Jessica Schwartz, “Conform or Die: Composing the City as National Security Threat, 1945-1962”

John Melillo, “Revenant Frequencies: Destructive Sound in “The Waste Land” to NYC Ghosts and Flowers

J. Martin Daughtry, “Evocative Objects and Provocative Actions on the Acoustic Territory of War”

Moderator: John Melillo


Speakers
JM

J. Martin Daughtry

J. Martin Daughtry is an ethnomusicologist in the NYU music department. Co-editor of Music in the Post-9/11 World (Routledge 2007) and author of articles on Russian musical nationalism, intermedial adaptation, and underground dissemination of music in the USSR, he is currently finishing a monograph on the sonic dimension of the Iraq war.   Abstract: | | "Evocative Objects and Provocative Actions on the Acoustic Territory of War" A new... Read More →
PD

Patrick Deer

Patrick Deer teaches twentieth century literature and culture in the English department at NYU. He is the author of Culture in Camouflage: War, Empire and Modern British Literature (Oxford, 2009) and a member of the Social Text editorial collective.   Abstract: | | "'The Cassette Played Poptones': Punk's Pop Embrace of the City in Ruins" The embrace of the city in ruins was a familiar rallying cry of punk music. From raucous calls for... Read More →
JM

John Melillo

John Melillo is a Visiting Assistant Professor and ACLS New Faculty Fellow at the University of Arizona. He completed his dissertation, Outside In: Noisescapes from Dada to Punk, in September of 2010 at New York University.   Abstract: | | "Revenant Frequencies: Destructive Sound from "The Waste Land" to NYC Ghosts and Flowers" T.S. Eliot’s “The Waste Land” and Sonic Youth’s New York City Ghosts and Flowers... Read More →
JS

Jessica Schwartz

Jessica A. Schwartz is a PhD candidate in Ethnomusicology at NYU. She is currently completing her dissertation that focuses on the sounds that emerged from the US nuclear testing program in the Marshall Islands.   Abstract: | | "Conform or Die: Composing the City as National Security Threat, 1945-1962" The “Nuke York, New York Exhibition” that took place at Cornell University in September 2011 stated... Read More →


Friday March 23, 2012 9:00am - 11:00am
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

9:00am

Afro-Imaginaries

Gayle Wald, “’Deliver De Letter’: ‘Please Mr. Postman,’ the Marvelettes, and the Afro-Caribbean Imaginary”


Emily J. Lordi, “Moving Out: White Flight and Sly and the
Family Stone’s ‘Stand!’”

Koushik Banerjea, “Cities of the Dead: Soundscaping Race, Memory
and Desire in a Forgotten London”

Wills Glasspiegel and Martin Scherzinger, “Beyoncé’s Afro-Future:
Power and Play in ‘Run the World (Girls)’”

Moderator: Banning Eyre


Speakers
KB

Koushik Banerjea

Koushik Banerjea is a lecturer in postcolonial theory in the Department of Sociology at the London School of Economics. He has written extensively about popular culture, music and film for Postcolonial Studies, Ethnic and Racial Studies and Theory, Culture and Society.   Abstract: | | "Cities of the Dead: Soundscaping Race, Memory and Desire in a Forgotten London" In the drab, shabby England of the late 1970s, early 1980s, its popular... Read More →
BE

Banning Eyre

Banning Eyre is an author, guitarist, radio producer, journalist, and Senior Editor at afropop.org. His work with the public radio series Afropop Worldwide has taken him to over a dozen African countries to research local music, especially guitar styles. He comments on world music for NPR’s All Things Considered. He is now editing a cultural biography about Thomas Mapfumo and the history of Zimbabwe.   Abstract: | | "Cairo... Read More →
WG

Wills Glasspiegel

Wills Glasspiegel is a graduate student in Media, Culture and Communications at NYU. He also manages Shangaan Electro and produces public radio documentaries about music.   Abstract: | | "Beyoncé's Afro-Future: Power and Play in 'Run the World (Girls)'" Metropolitan musical practice in the United States today is increasingly marked by complex networks of interlaced and overlapping cultural repertories of sound, music and... Read More →
EJ

Emily J. Lordi

Emily Lordi is an assistant professor of English at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. Her book, Black Resonance (forthcoming from Rutgers UP), re-examines the work of African American writers like Richard Wright and Nikki Giovanni through their engagements with classic black women singers. She has served as a book review editor for Callaloo and is currently the editor of exhibitions at Jazz at Lincoln Center. Her next book will be a... Read More →
MS

Martin Scherzinger

Martin Scherzinger is associate professor of Media, Culture, and Communication at New York University. His research specializes in sound studies, musical culture, media and politics.   Abstract: | | "Beyoncé's Afro-Future: Power and Play in 'Run the World (Girls)'" Metropolitan musical practice in the United States today is increasingly marked by complex networks of interlaced and overlapping cultural repertories of sound, music... Read More →
GW

Gayle Wald

Gayle Wald is writing a book on the TV show Soul! She teaches at George Washington University and is the author of Shout, Sister, Shout!, a biography of Rosetta Tharpe.   Abstract: | | "'Deliver De Letter': 'Please Mr. Postman,' the Marvelettes, and the Afro-Caribbean Imaginary" Berry Gordy touted Motown as the “Sound of Young America,” thereby insisting that black sounds—specifically the sounds of African American... Read More →


Friday March 23, 2012 9:00am - 11:00am
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

9:00am

Repositioning Urban Pop

 

Rustem Ertug Altinay, “In Konya She Would Marry a Regular Dude, But Serife from Konya is Now a Lady”: Power, Sexuality and Cities in Gungor Bayrak’s Autobigraphic Songs”

Erin MacLeod, “Layers and Layers of Not-So-Dope Synths”:
Listening to the Music of Addis Ababa

Mark Lomanno,”Surfaces and (Archi)textures in Canarian Jazz”

Moderator: Barbara Browning


Speakers
RE

Rustem Ertug Altinay

Doctoral Candidate, NYU, Department of Performance Studies
Rustem Ertug Altinay is a doctoral student at New York University, Department of Performance Studies. His main area of research is gender, sexuality and body politics in Turkey. His article on Turkish transgender diva Bulent Ersoy was published in the Trans- Special Issue of Women’s Studies Quarterly.   Abstract: | | "'In Konya she would marry a regular dude, but Serife from Konya is now a Lady': Power, Sexuality and Cities in... Read More →
BB

Barbara Browning

Barbara Browning teaches in the Department of Performance Studies at NYU. She is the author of the academic books Samba: Resistance in Motion and Infectious Rhythm: Metaphors of Contagion and the Spread of African Culture. She is also the author of three novels (Who Is Mr. Waxman?, The Correspondence Artist, and I’m Trying to Reach You). Her chamber choreographies can be viewed at http://www.youtube.com/ahnethermostfun/, and her ukulele... Read More →
ML

Mark Lomanno

Mark Lomanno, a Graduate Fellow and PhD Candidate in ethnomusicology at the University of Texas at Austin, is writing a dissertation on musical and cultural improvisations of Canarian jazz musicians. Mark maintains an active career as a jazz pianist and has forthcoming contributions in the Grove Dictionary of American Music.   Abstract: | | "Surfaces and (archi)Textures in Canarian Jazz" As an autonomous community of Spain, the veneers... Read More →
EM

Erin MacLeod

Erin MacLeod has a PhD in communications from McGill University and is presently a postdoctoral fellow at the University of the West Indies. Her research interests lie in the relationship between Jamaica and Ethiopia, Rastafari and Jamaican music in Africa and the connections between Africa and the African diaspora. She has written about music and popular culture for the Toronto Star, Montreal Mirror and Pitchfork, among... Read More →


Friday March 23, 2012 9:00am - 11:00am
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

9:00am

Early Category Killers

 

Steve Waksman, “On the World Stage: The Fisk Jubilee Singers and the World’s Peace Jubilee”

Keir Keightley, “From Hogan’s Alley to Tin Pan Alley: Media Synergy at the Turn of the Century”

David Brackett, “Fox Trots, Hillbillies, and the Classic Blues: Categorizing the 1920s”

Yuval Taylor, “’That’s Why Darkies Were Born’: Black Singers and the Minstrel Tradition in New York City, 1931–1933”

Moderator: Theo Cateforis


Speakers
DB

David Brackett

David Brackett is Associate Professor and Chair of the Musicology Program at the Schulich School of Music of McGill University. His publications include the Pop, Rock, and Soul Reader: Histories and Debates and Interpreting Popular Music. He is currently completing a book on genre and identity in 20th-century U. S. popular music.   Abstract: | | "Fox Trots, Hillbillies, and the Classic Blues: Categorizing the 1920s" During the 1920s... Read More →
TC

Theo Cateforis

Theo Cateforis is an Assistant Professor of Music History and Cultures in the Department of Art & Music Histories at Syracuse University. He is the author of Are We Not New Wave? Modern Pop at the Turn of the 1980s (University of Michigan Press, 2011) and editor of The Rock History Reader (Routledge, Second Edition forthcoming, 2012).
KK

Keir Keightley

Keir Keightley is Associate Professor in the Faculty of Information & Media Studies at the University of Western Ontario. His most recent publications are “Un voyage via barquinho...: Global Circulation, Musical Hybridization, and Adult Modernity, 1961-69” in Migrating Music (Routledge 2011) and “The Historical Consciousness of Sunshine Pop” in Journal of Popular Music Studies. This paper is part of a new book project... Read More →
YT

Yuval Taylor

Yuval Taylor is the coauthor, with Jake Austen, of Darkest America: Black Minstrelsy from Slavery to Hip-Hop (Norton, 2012) and, with Hugh Barker, of Faking It: The Quest for Authenticity in Popular Music (Norton, 2007). He acquires books on music, film, and African American interest for Chicago Review Press.   Abstract: | | ""That's Why Darkies Were Born": Black Singers and the Minstrel Tradition in New York City... Read More →
SW

Steve Waksman

Steve Waksman is Associate Professor of Music and American Studies at Smith College. He is the author of This Ain’t the Summer of Love: Conflict and Crossover in Heavy Metal and Punk (winner of the 2010 Woody Guthrie Award given by IASPM-US) and Instruments of Desire: The Electric Guitar and the Shaping of Musical Experience. Currently he is researching a cultural history of “live music” in the U.S. and co-editing the Sage... Read More →


Friday March 23, 2012 9:00am - 11:00am
The Global Center for Academic and Spiritual Life (GC) 238 Thompson Street, New York, NY 10012

9:00am

Roundtable: Feminist Musicking and Educational Activism in Urban Spaces

A discussion of the roles women have played in constituting radical counterpublic cultures within cities-—from Ellen Stewart’s La Mama theater to Judy Chicago’s Womanhouse project in the 70s to the contemporary explosion of “girls rock camp” programs throughout the world—and how the participants’ own feminist musicking and educational activism work is continuing, broadening, and redefining the terms of that legacy.

With: Lauren Onkey, LaRonda Davis, Karla Schickele, Maureen Mahon               

Moderator: Daphne Carr


Speakers
DC

Daphne Carr

Daphne Carr is the Series Editor of Best Music Writing (Da Capo 2007-present) and author of Nine Inch Nails Pretty Hate Machine (Continuum 2011). She co-founded and runs Girl Group, a listserv for and about women music journalists, the IASPM-US Committee on Diversity and Inclusion, and the EMP Feminist Working Group, and is currently a fellow at the Institute for Research on Women and Gender a Columbia University.   Abstract... Read More →
LD

LaRonda Davis

LaRonda Davis is President of the Black Rock Coalition, a national organization founded in 1985 by guitarist Vernon Reid, journalist Greg Tate and producer Konda Mason to maximize exposure and provide resources for Black artists who defy convention. Ms. Davis is also Vice President / Associate Creative Director at Publicis.   Abstract: | | "Feminist Musicking and Educational Activism in Urban Spaces" This roundtable discussion will... Read More →
MM

Maureen Mahon

Maureen Mahon, a cultural anthropologist, teaches in the ethnomusicology program in the Department of Music at New York University. She is the author of Right to Rock: The Black Rock Coalition and the Cultural Politics of Race (Duke University Press, 2004) and is currently at work on a book about African American women and rock and roll.   Abstract: | | "Feminist Musicking and Educational Activism in Urban Spaces" This roundtable... Read More →
LO

Lauren Onkey

Lauren Onkey is Vice President of Education and Public Programs at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum in Cleveland. She teaches at Case Western Reserve University and Cleveland State University and was formerly an English professor at Ball State University. Her publications include Blackness and Transatlantic Irish Identity: Celtic Soul Brothers (Routledge, 2009).   Abstract: | | "Feminist Musicking and Educational Activism in... Read More →
KS

Karla Schickele

Karla Schickele is Founding Executive Director of Willie Mae Rock Camp for Girls, a non-profit music and mentoring organization. WMRC operates summer and after school music programs for youth and adults throughout New York City, and was one of the organizations that founded the international Girls Rock Camp Alliance. Ms. Schickele also plays music as a member of the indie rock group Ida.   Abstract: | | "Feminist Musicking and Educational... Read More →


Friday March 23, 2012 9:00am - 11:00am
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

11:15am

Cairo and Athens Spring Up

Banning Eyre, “Cairo Soundscape: Revolution and Cultural Renaissance”

Maysan Haydar, “Wild in the (Arab) Streets: Songs for the Revolutions”

Hypatia Vourloumis, “Bad Athena: Crises, Syntheses and Sounds of a European Other”

Moderator: Katherine Meizel


Speakers
BE

Banning Eyre

Banning Eyre is an author, guitarist, radio producer, journalist, and Senior Editor at afropop.org. His work with the public radio series Afropop Worldwide has taken him to over a dozen African countries to research local music, especially guitar styles. He comments on world music for NPR’s All Things Considered. He is now editing a cultural biography about Thomas Mapfumo and the history of Zimbabwe.   Abstract: | | "Cairo... Read More →
MH

Maysan Haydar

Maysan Haydar has been on staff at culture and news magazines, and has essays in the anthologies Body Outlaws (Seal Press) and Damage Control (HarperCollins). She spent several semesters studying in Damascus, Syria. Abstract: | | "Wild in the (Arab) Streets: Songs for the Revolutions" Along with new governments in three countries (and counting), the Arab Spring ushered in attention to music beyond pop legends Najwa Karam and Amr Diab. The... Read More →
KM

Katherine Meizel

Katherine Meizel is an Assistant Professor of Ethnomusicology at Bowling Green State University. She has published in Slate.com, Popular Music & Society, and other journals and collections. Her book Idolized: Music, Media, and Identity in American Idol (Indiana University Press) was released in 2011.   Abstract: | | "Size Matters: 'Mini-Popstars' and New Dimensions of Celebrity Impersonation" Las Vegas has long been a national hub of... Read More →
HV

Hypatia Vourloumis

Hypatia Vourloumis received her Ph.D. in Performance Studies from New York University. She is a lecturer at the International Centre of Hellenic and Mediterranean Studies and Drury University Centre in Greece and has recently edited an anthology on contemporary Indonesian performance. Her teaching and research interests include modern Greek and postcolonial SE Asian cultural production.   Abstract: | | "Bad Athena: Crises, Syntheses and... Read More →


Friday March 23, 2012 11:15am - 12:45pm
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

11:15am

Lonely Subcultures

William Hutson, “Abrasive Nostalgia: A Noisescape of Deindustrialization”

Vivian L. Huang, “Not That Innocent: Britney Spears,
Laurel Nakadate and Strangers”

Julia DeLeon, “Dance Through the Dark Night: Distance,
Dissonance and Queer Belonging”

Moderator: Gustavus Stadler


Speakers
JD

Julia DeLeon

Julia DeLeon is a PhD student in Performance Studies at NYU. Research interests include belief, self-indulgence, and queer aesthetics. "Dance Through the Dark Night: Distance, Dissonance and Queer Belonging" Choreographer and sound designer Trajal Harrell’s recent work, Antigone Jr., is a fictive encounter between genres, subcultures and strangers. The performance is an answer to his hypothetical provocation: “What would have... Read More →
VL

Vivian L. Huang

Vivian L. Huang is writing a dissertation on inscrutability in Asian American performance in the Department of Performance Studies at New York University.   Abstract: | | "Not That Innocent: Britney Spears, Laurel Nakadate and Strangers" Though Laurel Nakadate is not known as a sound artist, this paper will argue that it is through the pop music icon Britney Spears that two of Nakadate's video art pieces explore the temporal-spatial... Read More →
WH

William Hutson

William Hutson is a PhD student in Performance Studies at UCLA. His current research is in the field of sound studies, where he investigates the role of the sonic in performance and installation art. He also reviews noise and experimental music for The Wire.   Abstract: | | "Abrasive Nostalgia: A Noisescape of Deindustrialization" While noise music has become a popular topic within hip continental discourse— with Ray Brassier... Read More →
GS

Gustavus Stadler

Gustavus Stadler teaches English at Haverford College and is author of Troubling Minds: The Cultural Politics of Genius in the US, 1840-1890 (Minnesota, 2006). He edited a special issue of Social Text on "The Politics of Recorded Sound" and is Co-Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Popular Music Studies.   Abstract: | | "Aural Drag: Warhol as Pop Listener" This paper is from a larger project on Warhol and anachronism which examines his... Read More →


Friday March 23, 2012 11:15am - 12:45pm
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

11:15am

Urban Poetics

Lori Brooks, “The Urban Poetics of Ragtime”

Jonathan Bogart, “The Little Window in My Shanty Streets: Urban Romanticism in Latin Music between the Wars”

Moderator: Charles McGovern


Speakers
JB

Jonathan Bogart

Jonathan Bogart is a listener and writer from Arizona. His examination of Ke$ha was selected for inclusion in the 2011 edition of Da Capo Best Music Writing, and his writing on music history has been noted in Pitchfork and the Guardian. He blogs at jonathanbogart.tumblr.com. Abstract: "The Little Window in My Shanty Streets: Urban Romanticism in Latin Music between the Wars" Carlos Gardel’s 1934 tango “Mi Buenos Aires... Read More →
LB

Lori Brooks

Lori L. Brooks is assistant professor in the Program in American Culture and the Department of African American Studies at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. She has recently completed a book-length manuscript on African American men who wrote ragtime songs for Tin Pan Alley and performed in vaudeville in New York City. She is currently pursuing two projects—a history of black female comediennes during the first half of the 20th... Read More →
CM

Charlie McGovern

Charlie McGovern teaches American studies and History at William and Mary in Williamsburg, VA. He wrote Sold American Consumption and Citizenship in American Life, 1890-1945, and he co-founded the Duke University Press series Refiguring American Music. He’s working on a book on pop music, race and citizenship, along with a shorter project on Nat Cole.   Abstract: | | "'Up in the Streets of Harlem': Black Vocal Groups and Postwar... Read More →


Friday March 23, 2012 11:15am - 12:45pm
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

11:15am

NYC Boombox

Kathryn Ostrofsky, “Taking Sesame to the Streets: Young Children’s Interactions with Pop Music in the Urban Classrooms of 1970s New York”

Mark Coleman, “’I Hear Music in the Streets’: New York’s Postdisco
Boombox Democracy” 

Scott Seward, “Puerto Ricans, Black Men, and No Less Than One
Dominican: Slammin’ the Rock with Todd Terry, Chep Nuñez , Blade Runners, and The Blue Jean Regime—An Exegesis of 1990’s Warlock Records War Party Compilation Sliced and Edited in the Style Of Omar Santana”

Moderator: Jim Miller


Speakers
MC

Mark Coleman

Mark Coleman is the author of Playback: From the Victrola to MP3, 100 Years of Music Machines and Money (Da Capo). A former senior editor at Rolling Stone, he moved to New York City in 1981 and began writing for New York Rocker and The Village Voice not long after. He still lives in New York, thirty years later.   Abstract: | | "These Are The Breaks: How a few dozen obscure records transformed the world of pop music" As the legend... Read More →
JM

Jim Miller

Jim Miller, formerly a rock critic for Rolling Stone, the New Republic, and for Newsweek (1980-1990), is Professor of Politics at the New School for Social Research.  The original editor of  The Rolling Stone Illustrated History of Rock and Roll, he is also the author of Flowers in the Dustbin: the Rise of Rock’n’roll, 1947-1977.
KO

Kathryn Ostrofsky

Kathryn A. Ostrofsky is a Ph.D. candidate in History at the University of Pennsylvania, studying media and music in 20th century American culture. She is working on a dissertation tentatively entitled "Everybody's Song: Sesame Street Music and the History of Familiarity and Participation in 20th Century Popular Culture."   Abstract: | | "Taking Sesame to the Streets: Young Children's Interactions with Pop Music in the Urban Classrooms... Read More →
SS

Scott Seward

Scott Seward wrote frequently for the Village Voice music section from 1999 to 2006. Since 2006, he has written monthly for Decibel Magazine. He also owns and operates John Doe Jr. Used Records & Books in Greenfield, Massachusetts.   Abstract: | | "Puerto Ricans, Black Men, and No Less Than One Dominican: Slammin' the Rock with Todd Terry, Chep Nuñez , Blade Runners, and The Blue Jean Regime – An Exegesis of 1990's... Read More →


Friday March 23, 2012 11:15am - 12:45pm
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

11:15am

Turn It Up! One: Listening to Difference

Summer Kim Lee, “‘Singin’ Up On You’: Queer Intimacies of the Sonorous Body In ‘The New Sound Karaoke’”

Daniel Sander, “Girl. Reverb. Notes on Queer Tactics of
Sonorous Difference”

Kyessa L. Moore, “(Sub)Spacialized Urban Sound, Expressive
Communion and Identificatory Dislocations”

This panel is sponsored by the Feminist Working Group. Since 2008, we have organized panels, get-togethers and networking opportunities for all feminists who participate in EMP Pop Conference.
For more information about our activities, and to get involved,
please visit http://feministworkinggroup.blogspot.com

Moderator: Lucy O’Brien


Speakers
SK

Summer Kim Lee

Summer Kim Lee earned her BA at New York University’s Gallatin School of Individualized Study, creating an interdisciplinary concentration in women of color performance artists in New York. She then completed her MA at New York University’s Performance Studies, studying the aesthetics and structures of racialized feeling and embodiment within vocal performance in popular music. As a PhD candidate, she is continuing to pursue the... Read More →
KL

Kyessa L. Moore

Kyessa L. Moore is a Ph.D student in the English Literature Department at Princeton University. Her interests include: African American/Black Literature, critical theory, film studies, cultural studies (i.e. the historicized production of race and gender, visual studies, sensory studies, haptic theory), and Futurama.   Abstract: | | "(Sub)Spacialized Urban Sound, Expressive Communion and Identificatory Dislocations" In the collection... Read More →
LO

Lucy O'Brien

Writer/broadcaster Lucy O’Brien wrote She Bop 1 and II, a history of women in popular music (1995 & 2002), with a third edition due next year. She has also published in-depth biographies including Madonna: Like An Icon (2007) and Dusty (2000). Her paper is drawn from a recently published piece in Vol 1 of the journal Punk & Post Punk. She is Lecturer in Music Journalism at Epsom University of Creative Arts, UK.   Abstract... Read More →
DS

Daniel Sander

Daniel Sander holds a BA in studio art from Reed College and MAs in Arts Politics and Performance Studies from NYU. His transdisciplinary creative and academic work concerns the philosophy of desire, the psychopathology of deviance, libidinal materialism, and queer nihilism, and has been exhibited, published, and performed internationally. He is currently a doctoral student in performance studies, NYU.   Abstract: | | "Girl. Reverb. Notes... Read More →


Friday March 23, 2012 11:15am - 12:45pm
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

11:15am

Urban Cameos

 RJ Smith, “There Was a Time: James Brown in Augusta”

Dave Tompkins, “The Beat Who Cheated Death”

Carlo Rotella, “Shipping Up to Boston: A Pecking Order”

Moderator: Andrew Ross


Speakers
FH

Frank Harmon

Dave Tompkins’ vocoder book, How To Wreck A Nice Beach, was named entertainment book of the year by Amazon in 2010. His writing has appeared in Oxford American, Grantland, The Believer, Village Voice and The Wire.   Abstract: | | "The Beat Who Cheated Death" “The Beat Who Cheated Death” is a cultural, geological, and political history of Miami, propagating from a species of environmental architecture known as the Bass... Read More →
AR

Andrew Ross

Andrew Ross is a Professor of Social and Cultural Analysis at New York University. A contributor to the Nation, the Village Voice, New York Times, and Artforum, he is the author of many books, including No Respect: Intellectuals and Popular Culture, and he is the co-editor of Microphone Fiends: Youth Music and Youth Culture. His most recent book is Bird On Fire: Lessons from the World’s Least Sustainable City.
CR

Carlo Rotella

Carlo Rotella, Director of American Studies and Professor of English at Boston College, writes regularly for the New York Times Magazine and Washington Post Magazine and writes an op-ed column for the Boston Globe. His next book, Playing in Time, will be published in 2012.   Abstract: | | "Shipping Up to Boston: A Pecking Order" Like Jonathan Papelbon, the Red Sox closer who enters to the strains of “Shipping Up to... Read More →
RS

RJ Smith

RJ Smith has been a senior editor at Los Angeles magazine, a contributor to Blender, a columnist for The Village Voice, a staff writer at Spin, and a contributor to numerous other publications. His award-winning cultural history, The Great Black Way, was a Los Angeles Times bestseller. His new biography of James Brown is titled The One.   Abstract: | | "There Was a Time: James Brown in Augusta" One city looms largest in the shaping of... Read More →


Friday March 23, 2012 11:15am - 12:45pm
The Global Center for Academic and Spiritual Life (GC) 238 Thompson Street, New York, NY 10012

12:45pm

Lunch Break

FOOD AND DRINK

The Market Place at the Kimmel Center offers a variety of international and traditional dining choices including:

The Italian Market

Faye’s Deli

Habanero Mexican

Halal

Yolato Frozen Yogurt


Friday March 23, 2012 12:45pm - 2:15pm
Break

1:00pm

Willie Mae Rock Camp for Girls

This rock camp music showcase will bring to life, and sound out, the spirit of feminist music empowerment through arts educational activism. It will feature a performance by the band Still Saffire, playing originally composed songs.


Speakers
SS

Still Saffire

Indie-rock band Still Saffire is the coming together of two sets of 14- 17-y-o sisters: Sonya and Charlotte/Soreya and Annika. The band’s catchy, harmony-filled tunes have brought them to many venues in the New York area. One of Still Saffire’s missions is to “play for a cause” and since their inception the band has performed at over forty benefits and fundraisers. They established the “Still Saffire Sisters Scholarship Fund,” which... Read More →


Friday March 23, 2012 1:00pm - 1:30pm
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

1:00pm

“We’re Gonna Rise When the Sun’s Going Down”: Peter Stampfel in Conversation with RJ Smith

A ramble through the life of the man Robert Christgau called the other genius to come out of the Greenwich Village folk scene, with pointers on the days before Bob, Harry Smith, the Fugs, playing music with Sam Shepard, Mississippi John Hurt, and Lester Bangs, the great Have Moicy album, and the recent recording of Have Moicy 2.


Speakers
RS

RJ Smith

RJ Smith has been a senior editor at Los Angeles magazine, a contributor to Blender, a columnist for The Village Voice, a staff writer at Spin, and a contributor to numerous other publications. His award-winning cultural history, The Great Black Way, was a Los Angeles Times bestseller. His new biography of James Brown is titled The One.   Abstract: | | "There Was a Time: James Brown in Augusta" One city looms largest in the shaping of... Read More →
PS

Peter Stampfel

Peter Stampfel has been called the other genius to come out of the Greenwich Village folk scene (Bob Christgau said it). He can talk folk in the days before Bob, the birth of the Fugs, playing with Sam Shepard, Mississippi John Hurt, and Lester Bangs, the great Have Moicy album and the recent recording of Have Moicy 2. His recent Come on Board was a collaboration with Jeffrey Lewis. Stampfel knows them all. He is one.


Friday March 23, 2012 1:00pm - 2:00pm
The Global Center for Academic and Spiritual Life (GC) 238 Thompson Street, New York, NY 10012

2:15pm

Turn It Up! Two: Making Community

 

Matthew Carrillo-Vincent, “Ears to the Streets, Peripheral Beats:
The New Social Map of Backpack Rap”

Evelyn McDonnell, “The Roads to Ruin”

Rachel Devitt, “I Love a (Pride) Parade: Queer Community-Building,
Temporary Spaces and Politicized Kitsch among LGBT Marching Bands”

Moderator: Elizabeth Keenan


Speakers
MC

Matthew Carrillo-Vincent

Matthew Carrillo-Vincent is a Doctoral Candidate in English and Gender Studies at the University of Southern California. He is completing his dissertation on the politics of male sentimentality in US popular cultures, from abolitionist literature to emo music.   Abstract: | | "Ears to the Streets, Peripheral Beats: The New Social Map of Backpack Rap" The myth of sentimentality is that it’s a white man’s game; the myth of the... Read More →
RD

Rachel Devitt

Rachel Devitt is a writer and editor who currently writes and edits predominantly in the digital media world for outlets like Rhapsody and Google Music. She also has a PhD in ethnomusicology and is working on a book about pop music in queer performance art. She plays the flute in Chicago\'s LGBT marching band (and realizes the futility of said endeavor).   Abstract: | | "I Love a (Pride) Parade: Queer Community-Building, Temporary... Read More →
EK

Elizabeth Keenan

Elizabeth K. Keenan completed her doctorate at Columbia University in 2008 with a dissertation on feminist politics, popular music, and the American middle class. Her work has received the Wong Tolbert and Lise Waxer Prizes from the Society for Ethnomusicology and has been published in Women & Music, JPMS, and Current Musicology. She teaches at Fordham University and Columbia University.   Abstract: | | "Out in the Streets: 1960s Girl... Read More →
EM

Evelyn McDonnell

Evelyn McDonnell is assistant professor of journalism and new media at Loyola Marymount University. She’s the author of Mamarama, Army of She and Rent by Jonathan Larson and coedited Rock She Wrote and Stars Don’t Stand Still in the Sky. She has been the editorial director of www.MOLI.com, pop culture writer at The Miami Herald, and senior editor at The Village Voice.   Abstract: | | "The Roads to Ruin" In 1975 five teenagers... Read More →


Friday March 23, 2012 2:15pm - 3:45pm
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

2:15pm

New York Rockers

Jesse Jarnow, “From Gem Spa to the World: New York Rocker and
the Exploding City”

Lisa Jane Persky, “58th & 5th:  My Dream Date With The Ramones”

Keith Harris, “Did New York Kill Indie Rock?”

Moderator: Evie Nagy


Speakers
KH

Keith Harris

Keith Harris is a lawyer and rock critic whose criticism has appeared all over the place, including Rolling Stone, Spin, Slate, Salon, the Village Voice, the Chicago Reader, and City Pages. He lives and thrives in Minneapolis.   Abstract: | | "Did New York Kill Indie Rock?" Throughout the '80s and '90s, in college towns like Chapel Hill and Athens and in second-tier cities like Minneapolis and Seattle, local independent rock scenes... Read More →
JJ

Jesse Jarnow

In June 2012, Gotham will publish Jesse Jarnow\'s book, Big Day Coming: Yo La Tengo and the Rise of Indie Rock. His work has appeared in the Village Voice, Rolling Stone, Paste, Relix (where he is a contributing editor) and elsewhere. He hosts the Frow Show on WFMU.   Abstract: | | "From Gem Spa to the World: New York Rocker and the Exploding City" In some ways, the 54 issues New York Rocker published between February 1976 and... Read More →
EN

Evie Nagy

Evie Nagy is the managing editor of RollingStone.com and co-hosts the weekly podcast Awesomed By Comics. She was previously an editor at Billboard and writes about music, culture, and comic books for a variety of publications. A former university administrator and speechwriter, she was published in Best Music Writing 2010 and co-wrote the afterword for a recent anthology of the late Ellen Willis’s rock writing.
LJ

Lisa Jane Persky

Lisa Jane Persky is Editor-at-Large of the Los Angeles Review of Books. She was an early participant in the CBGB scene and a founding photographer/writer of the New York Rocker--the Blondie song “(I‘m Always Touched by Your) Presence, Dear” was written for her. Her journalism and photography has appeared in Mojo, Q, Uncut, The Los Angeles Times and Fortean Times; her fiction has appeared in Bomb and has been anthologized in... Read More →


Friday March 23, 2012 2:15pm - 3:45pm
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

2:15pm

Memory, Music, and the Metropolis

Tracy McMullen, “In the Beginning, You Are There: Cloning
Genesis and the Return of the Urbane”

Tavia Nyong’o, “Shame and Scandal and Zombies”

Karen Tongson, “Drive and Sounds of the ‘80s Metropolis”

Moderator: Charles Kronengold


Speakers
CK

Charles Kronengold

Charles Kronengold has published on popular music, Western art music, film and aesthetics. This paper’s focus on “puzzling interfacing” expands on a theme in his second book, Different Methods, Different Signs: Crediting Thinking in Soul and Dance Music. He teaches musicology at Stanford.   Abstract: | | "Sensing Thinking, Puzzling Interfacing" Early-eighties experimental music in New York City looked and felt as odd... Read More →
TM

Tracy McMullen

Tracy McMullen is a Provost’s Postdoctoral Scholar in the Humanities at USC. Her manuscript-in-progress, Replay: Repetition and Identity Compulsion from ABBA to Zizek examines live musical re-enactment as a cultural practice. She is also a saxophonist in the jazz and experimental music traditions and can be heard on the Cadence jazz label, among others.   Abstract: | | "In the Beginning, You Are There: Cloning Genesis and the Return... Read More →
TN

Tavia Nyong'o

Tavia Nyong’o writes and teaches about performance, popular music, and cultural theory at New York University. His first book, The Amalgamation Waltz, came out in 2009. He is now working on a project about black aesthetics of the untimely. Abstract: | | "Shame and Scandal and Zombies" This talk begins in the first decade of the twenty first century, when the group Madness releases an album of classic ska and reggae tune to... Read More →
KT

Karen Tongson

Karen Tongson is the author of Relocations: Queer Suburban Imaginaries (NYU Press, 2011), co-editor-in-chief of the Journal of Popular Music Studies, and co-series editor for Postmillennial Pop, a book series at NYU Press. An Associate Professor of English and Gender Studies at USC, Tongson is currently at work on two projects: a short book about karaoke, and a longer monograph about performers in the Pacific Rim/Desert West "leisure... Read More →


Friday March 23, 2012 2:15pm - 3:45pm
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

2:15pm

Broadway Bound

Raymond Knapp, “The Sound of Broadway’s Mean Streets”

Jacqueline Warwick, “’Bigger than Big and Smaller than Small’: Child Stars, Street Urchins, and Little Orphan Annie”

Elizabeth L. Wollman and Susan Tenneriello, “Spider-Man: Turn off
the Dark
and the Ambivalence of Spectacle”

Moderator: Caroline Polk O’Meara


Speakers
RK

Raymond Knapp

Raymond Knapp is Professor of Musicology at UCLA. His books include Symphonic Metamorphoses: Subjectivity and Alienation in Mahler’s Re-Cycled Songs, The American Musical and the Formation of National Identity (winner of the George Jean Nathan Award for Dramatic Criticism), The American Musical and the Performance of Personal Identity, and The Oxford Handbook of the American Musical.   Abstract: | | "The Sound of Broadway's Mean... Read More →
CP

Caroline Polk O'Meara

Caroline Polk O’Meara is a musicologist who teaches at the University of Texas at Austin. Her research examines late twentieth-century American music. She is the treasurer of IASPM-US.
JW

Jacqueline Warwick

Jacqueline Warwick is associate professor of Music and Gender & Women’s Studies at Dalhousie University. She is the author of Girl Groups, Girl Culture: Popular Music and Identity in the 1960s (Routledge, 2007) and a senior editor for the Grove Dictionary of American Music.   Abstract: | | "'Bigger than Big and Smaller than Small': Child Stars, Street Urchins, and Little Orphan Annie" Child performers delight us with dazzling... Read More →
EL

Elizabeth L. Wollman

Elizabeth L. Wollman is Assistant Professor of Music in the Fine and Performing Arts Department at Baruch College, CUNY. She is the author of The Theater Will Rock: A History of the Rock Musical from Hair to Hedwig (University of Michigan, 2006) and the forthcoming Hard Times: The Adult Musical in 1970s New York City (Oxford University Press).   Abstract: | | "Spider-Man: Turn off the Dark and the Ambivalence of Spectacle" Since... Read More →


Friday March 23, 2012 2:15pm - 3:45pm
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

2:15pm

Roundtable: The Church of What’s Happening Now: Improv 2012 and the Cosmopolitan Truth

 

This gathering will examine  the economics, aesthetics  and ethnicities of improvisational music culture in present-day NYC, with special emphasis on how older definitions of jazz have been provoked, transformed and morphed by contemporary urban artists and audiences. The role of digital technologies and social media will be in the mix too, as well as race, class and gender issues and the impact of gentrification.

With: Marika Hughes, Vijay Iyer, José James, Butch Morris, and Mazz Swift.

Moderator: Greg Tate


Speakers
MH

Marika Hughes

Brooklyn-based cellist Marika Hughes was born in NYC to a musical family. She is the granddaughter of famed cellist Emanuel Feuermann and she grew up in her parents jazz club, Burgundy, on the Upper West Side. Marika recently debuted as a bandleader with her album The Simplest Thing (2011). She also released Afterlife Music Radio - 11 New Pieces for Solo Cello (2011) with compositions written for her by Carla Kihlstedt, Nasheet Waits, Eyvind Kang... Read More →
VI

Vijay Iyer

Grammy-nominated composer-pianist Vijay Iyer was described by Pitchfork as "one of the most interesting and vital young pianists in jazz today," Iyer has released fifteen albums as a leader, most recently Tirtha (2011), Solo (2010), and the multiple-award-winning Historicity (2009). A polymath whose career has spanned the sciences, the humanities and the arts, Iyer holds a B.S. in Mathematics and Physics from Yale University.   Abstract... Read More →
BM

Butch Morris

Lawrence D. "Butch" Morris is recognized internationally as the principal theorist and practitioner in the evolution of Conduction®, and a leading innovator in the confluence of jazz, new music, improvisation and contemporary classical music. His work redefines the roles of composer, conductor, arranger and performer, and bridges the gap between the composer, interpreter and improviser.   Abstract: | | "The Church of What's... Read More →
MS

Mazz Swift

Native New Yorker and solo artist Mazz Swift, performing under the name MazzMuse, combines elements of classical, folk, electronica, jazz and otherwise free improvisational music to create a complete musical experience. She is a singer and Juilliard trained violinist (playing both electric and acoustic instruments) who brings her passion for creating true compositions in the spur of the moment to audiences around the world.   Abstract... Read More →
GT

Greg Tate

Greg Tate is a writer and musician who lives in Harlem. His books include Flyboy In The Buttermilk, Midnight Lightning: Jimi Hendrix and The Black Experience, and Everything But The Burden: What Black People Are Taking from White Culture. He is currently working on a book about James Brown for FS&G. Flyboy 2: The Greg Tate Reader will one day be published by Duke University Press.   Abstract: | | "The Church of What's Happening Now... Read More →


Friday March 23, 2012 2:15pm - 3:45pm
The Global Center for Academic and Spiritual Life (GC) 238 Thompson Street, New York, NY 10012

2:15pm

Roundtable: Tropical Music, Appropriation and Music “Discovery” in the Global Metropolis

The explosion of international sounds in the pop sphere—associated with Pitbull, Black Eyed Peas, Shakira and M.I.A, among others-—has been paralleled and driven by a mirror-underground usually simply called global bass, ghetto bass, or tropical bass. This roundtable explores the power dynamics of cultural appropriation, tastemaking and music discovery within this digital space, looking at rap, Bollywood, kwaito, Baltimore club, dancehall, baile funk, bhangra, cumbia villera, etc., where they merge into this new melting pot/marketplace.

With: Rekha Malhotra aka DJ Rekha, Wayne Marshall, Venus X Iceberg

Moderator: Edwin STATS Houghton


Speakers
ES

Edwin STATS Houghton

Edwin STATS Houghton is the editor-in-chief of Okayplayer.com and a former contributing editor for FADER magazine where he established the weekly Ghetto Palms column/DJ blog. His cover stories on Vybz Kartel, Sean Paul, Tego Calderon and others have been instrumental in shining a light on the region’s styles and stars to the mainstream press. He has held down DJ residencies at Basement Bhangra, Heavwye1ght Sessions and the Rubin... Read More →
VX

Venus X Iceberg

Venus X Iceberg (née Jazmin Venus Soto) is resident DJ and founder of The Ghe20 Gothik Party (voted best party in 2011 Village Voice) which serves as home base to many recently emerged hybrid rave/hip-hop genres. Her twitter rants calling out DJ/Producer Diplo raise questions of cultural appropriation and have been the subject of much discussion on feminist and music blogs alike.   Abstract: | | "Tropical Music, Appropriation... Read More →
WM

Wayne Marshall

Wayne Marshall is an ethnomusicologist, blogger (wayneandwax.com), and DJ. While working on a book about music and digital youth culture, he's currently teaching at Brandeis University. He co-edited and contributed to Reggaeton (Duke 2009) and has written for The Wire, the Boston Phoenix, and journals such as Popular Music and Callaloo.   Abstract: | | "Music as Social Life in an Age of Platform Politricks" The advent of socially... Read More →
RM

Rekha Malhotra AKA DJ Rekha

Rekha Malhotra AKA DJ Rekha is a DJ, producer and founder of Basement Bhangra™ and Bollywood Disco club nights. She has designed sound for "Bridge and Tunnel" on Broadway and NPR, and curated shows for Summerstage, Celebrate Brooklyn and 92Y Tribeca. She is an adjunct lecturer at NYU’s Clive Davis Institute of Recorded Music where she teaches about contemporary South Asian music and DJ culture.   Abstract: | | "Tropical Music... Read More →


Friday March 23, 2012 2:15pm - 3:45pm
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

4:00pm

Metropolitan Borders

Josh Kun, “Maquiladora de Sueños: Music in Factory City”

Blanca Méndez, “Tijuana Makes Some Noise: Ruidoson as a Response and Resistance to Violence in Baja California’s Largest City”

Jennie Gubner, “(Bar)rio Tango: The Politics of Locality in the Neighborhood Tango Scenes of Buenos Aires”

Kathleen Costello, “Manu Chao’s Sonic Embodiment of the Border: A Musical Ethics of the In-Between”

Moderator: Vivien Goldman


Speakers
KC

Kathleen Costello

Kathleen Costello is Associate Professor of Modern Languages & Cultures at St. John Fisher College in Rochester, NY. Her publications have focused on the relationship between twentieth-century Caribbean literature and Caribbean popular music, and her recent conference presentations have focused on topics such as notions of hip-hop authenticity in connection to the Cuban ex-pat group Orishas and the role of an Afro-Caribbean musical... Read More →
VG

Viven Goldman

Vivien Goldman is a writer, educator, broadcaster and post-punk musician. She has been an Adjunct Professor at the Clive Davis Institute since 2006. Her \"Launderette\" 45 is much re-issued and was sampled by MadLib. The most recent of her five books is The Book of Exodus: The Making & Meaning of Bob Marley\'s Album of the Century (Three Rivers Press.) Goldman covers the American charts for BBC Radio 6 and writes the Global Jukebox column for... Read More →
JG

Jennie Gubner

Jennie Gubner is a doctoral student in Ethnomusicology at UCLA. She is currently conducting fieldwork for her dissertation on the neighborhood tango music scenes of Buenos Aires, Argentina. Jennie has been involved in the underground tango music community of Buenos Aires as a violinist, filmmaker, and researcher since 2005.   Abstract: | | "(Bar)rio Tango: The Politics of Locality in the Neighborhood Tango Scenes of Buenos Aires" My... Read More →
JK

Josh Kun

Josh Kun is a professor in the Annenberg School for Communication & Journalism at USC where he directs The Popular Music Project of The Norman Lear Center. With The Grammy Museum, he is the curator of the 2012 Pacific Standard Time exhibition Trouble in Paradise: Music and Los Angeles 1945-1975.   Abstract: | | "Maquiladora de Sueños: Music in Factory City" This paper will explore the impact of global maquiladora assembling... Read More →
BM

Blanca Mendez

Blanca Méndez is a Chicago-based freelance writer, editor, and podcast producer who covers music and culture for Club Fonograma and The Hairpin. Her focus is on independent Latin American music and online platforms as performance venues. She is especially interested in the music of borderlands.   "Tijuana Makes Some Noise: Ruidoson as a Response and Resistance to Violence in Baja California's Largest City" As Tijuana evolves from a... Read More →


Friday March 23, 2012 4:00pm - 6:00pm
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

4:00pm

Street Sounds

Myron Gray, “French Music in Federal Philadelphia”

Elijah Wald, “The Dirty Dozens: From Mississippi Blues to Gangsta Rap”

Reebee Garofalo, “Not Your Parents’ Marching Bands: ‘HONK! Pedagogy’ and Music Education”

Elisabeth Woronzoff-Dashkoff, “A Minor Representation as a Major Identity: Interviews with Musicians with Disabilities”

Moderator: David Suisman


Speakers
RQ

Robert "Reebee" Garofalo

Professor Emeritus, UMass Boston
Reebee Garofalo is professor emeritus at UMass Boston. His most recent book is Rockin' Out: Popular Music in the USA. He is a member of the Organizing Committee for the HONK! Festival of Activist Street Bands (honkfest,org) and a snare drummer for the Second Line Social Aid and Pleasure Society Brass Band (slsaps.org). |   | Abstract:"Not Your Parents' Marching Bands: 'HONK! Pedagogy' and Music Education" | The HONK! Festival of Activist... Read More →
MG

Myron Gray

Myron Gray is a doctoral candidate in music history at the University of Pennsylvania. The recipient of a Doctoral Fellowship from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, he has presented internationally on topics ranging from pantomime ballet to recording practice. Myron’s dissertation considers French aesthetico-political practice in 1790s Philadelphia.   Abstract: | | "French Music in Federal... Read More →
DS

David Suisman

David Suisman is associate professor of history at the University of Delaware. His is author of Selling Sounds: The Commercial Revolution in American Music recipient of numerous awards and honors (including honorable mention for IASPM-US’s Woody Guthrie Prize) and co-editor of Sound in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction. He is also associate editor of the Journal for Popular Music Studies and a sometime disc jockey at... Read More →
EW

Elijah Wald

Elijah Wald is a writer and musician who has published thousands of articles and ten books on blues, Mexican drug ballads, U.S. and global pop styles, and hitchhiking. His latest work, The Dozens: A History of Rap’s Mama, is due from Oxford University Press in June 2012.   Abstract: | | "The Dirty Dozens: From Mississippi Blues to Gangsta Rap" A century before gangsta rappers took dirty rhyming to the top of the charts... Read More →
EW

Elisabeth Woronzoff-Dashkoff

Elisabeth Woronzoff-Dashkoff is currently a doctoral candidate in the American Culture Studies program at Bowling Green State University in Ohio. She studies and researches the ways women in music, both contemporary and historically, shape the gender, disability, political, and cultural boundaries of the independent and mainstream music industry.   Abstract: | | "A Minor Representation as a Major Identity: Interviews with Musicians with... Read More →


Friday March 23, 2012 4:00pm - 6:00pm
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

4:00pm

Location Location Location

Keith Negus, “Making it in the Big City: Small Town Boys, Country Girls and Suburban Dreamers”

Jennifer C. Lena, “The Ground on which the Race was Run:
Careers in Pop”

Carl Wilson, “We Hate It When Our Friends Become Successful:
The Death and Life of Great North American Scenius”

Kembrew McLeod and Loren Glass, “The Killer Apps Play the Sounds
of the Cities”

Moderator: Fabian Holt


Speakers
LG

Loren Glass

Loren Glass is Associate Professor of English at the University of Iowa. He writes on celebrity, obscenity, modernism, and the avant-garde. He is currently completing a history of Grove Press which will appear in the Post*45 Series with Stanford University Press.   Abstract: | | "Killer Apps Play the Sounds of the Cities" Take an aural tour of musical cities with the Killer Apps, Iowa City’s Best All Mobile Phone Cover Band... Read More →
FH

Fabian Holt

Fabian Holt, Ph.D., Associate Professor, University of Roskilde. Holt specializes in the consumption and production of live music and cultural events in the digital age. His publications include Genre in Popular Music (Chicago 2007), Musical Performance and the Changing City (forthcoming), and articles in various international journals.   Abstract: | | "How Live Music Clubs in New York City Have Adapted to Gentrification: The Case of... Read More →
JC

Jennifer C. Lena

Jennifer C. Lena is Assistant Professor of Sociology at Barnard College and author of Banding Together: How Communities Create Genres in Popular Music (2012, Princeton UP). Her 2005 EMP talk was published in 2008 and reprinted in the second edition of the Forman and Neal (eds.) reader, That’s the Joint!.   Abstract: | | "The Ground on which the Race was Run: Careers in Pop" What characteristics of place impact musical careers... Read More →
KM

Kembrew McLeod

Kembrew McLeod is a writer, filmmaker, and Associate Professor of Communication Studies at the University of Iowa. He has published several books on music, copyright, and culture, and is finishing a book on media pranks for NYU Press. McLeod’s co-produced documentary Copyright Criminals aired in 2010 on PBS’s Emmy Award-winning series Independent Lens.   Abstract: | | "Killer Apps Play the Sounds of the Cities" Take an... Read More →
KN

Keith Negus

Keith Negus, Professor of Musicology, Goldsmiths, University of London entered higher education as a mature student, having spent many years playing keyboards and guitar in a variety of bands. He completed a PhD study of the music industry and subsequently taught at the Universities of Leicester and Puerto Rico before moving to Goldsmiths. His books include Producing Pop (1992), Music Genres and Corporate Cultures (1999), and Bob Dylan... Read More →
CW

Carl Wilson

Carl Wilson is the author of Let’s Talk About Love: A Journey to the End of Taste (33 1/3 Series). He is an editor at The Globe and Mail, a blogger at backtotheworld.net and a curator for the Trampoline Hall Lecture Series, and has written for The New York Times, The L.A. Times, Slate, the Oxford American and many others.   Abstract: | | "We Hate It When Our Friends Become Successful: The Death and Life of Great North American... Read More →


Friday March 23, 2012 4:00pm - 6:00pm
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

4:00pm

Clubways

Michaelangelo Matos, “A Trip to MARS-FM: The Story of L.A.’s Rave Radio Station, 1991-92”

Al Shipley, “Tough Breaks: The Story of Baltimore Club Music”

Benjamin Court, “Feeling the Political in ‘Can You Feel It?’”

Joshua Clark Davis, “G.I. Rap and Euro-Dance: How American Soldiers and Germans Created a Hybrid Hip Hop Culture in Cold-War Frankfurt”

Moderator: Holly George-Warren


Speakers
BC

Benjamin Court

Benjamin Court is a current graduate student in musicology at UCLA. His primary musical interests lie in the 20th century, especially popular music since the 1960s. Benjamin is also working toward his certification in Experimental Critical Theory at UCLA focusing on utopian theories and the philosophy of Alain Badiou.   Abstract: | | "Feeling the Political in 'Can You Feel It?'" Sociological readings of electronic dance music often... Read More →
JC

Joshua Clark Davis

Joshua Clark Davis is a Fellow at the German Historical Institute researching how hip hop came to Europe in the 1980s. His recent article, "For the Records: How African American Consumers and Music Retailers Created Commercial Public Space in the 1960s and 1970s South," appears in the winter 2011 issue of Southern Cultures.   Abstract: | | "G.I. Rap and Euro-Dance: How American Soldiers and Germans Created a Hybrid Hip Hop Culture... Read More →
HG

Holly George-Warren

Holly George-Warren is the author of a dozen books, including The Road to Woodstock (with Michael Lang) and the award-winning Public Cowboy No. 1: The Life & Times of Gene Autry. She has written for Rolling Stone, the Village Voice, and the New York Times, and she coproduced the Grammy-nominated box set RESPECT. She teaches at NYU’s Clive Davis Institute of Recorded Music and at SUNY-New Paltz and is at work on a biography of Alex... Read More →
MM

Michaelangelo Matos

Michaelangelo Matos writes for NPR, Spin, Rolling Stone, Village Voice, The Guardian, The Daily, and eMusic. He is working on a history of American rave in the ’90s. He lives in Brooklyn.   Abstract: | | "A Trip to MARS-FM: The Story of L.A.'s Rave Radio Station, 1991-92" From late 1991 until July 1992, Southern California’s airwaves heralded the future. Utilizing a synchronized signal at 103.1 FM in Los Angeles (KDLD... Read More →
AS

Al Shipley

Al Shipley is a Maryland-based music critic and journalist whose work has appeared in publications and websites such as the Baltimore Sun, the Baltimore City Paper, Scratch Magazine, XXL, The Village Voice, Pitchfork, and Idolator. His first book, Tough Breaks: The Story of Baltimore Club Music, will be published in 2013.   Abstract: | | "Tough Breaks: The Story of Baltimore Club Music" Baltimore, the mid-Atlantic rust belt city may have... Read More →


Friday March 23, 2012 4:00pm - 6:00pm
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

4:00pm

Detroit: Foundation, Eclecticism, and Memory

Rebekah Farrugia and Kellie Hay, “‘The Foundation’ in Detroit: Challenging Conventional Ideologies about Sex and Gender in Hip Hop”

Denise Dalphond, “Eclecticism in Detroit: Diverse Dance Party Scenes in Electronic Music”

Carleton S. Gholz, “Remembering Rita: Sound, Sexuality, and Memory”

Moderator and Respondent: Marlon Bailey


Speakers
MB

Marlon Bailey

Marlon Bailey is an Assistant Professor of Gender Studies at Indiana University. He earned his PhD in African Diaspora Studies at the University of California-Berkeley. Currently, he is working on a book manuscript that expands his performance ethnographic study of Ballroom Culture, a Black and Latina/o queer culture in North America. Butch Queens up in Pumps: Gender, Performance, and Ballroom Culture in Detroit, is under contract with the... Read More →
DD

Denise Dalphond

Denise Dalphond is a doctoral candidate in Ethnomusicology at Indiana University. She conducted ethnographic research on electronic music culture in Detroit from 2008-2010. Her dissertation, titled “Detroit Players: Wax, Tracks, and Soul in Electronic Music,” documents the thriving techno, house, and electro scenes in southeast Michigan, including the African American history of electronic music in Detroit and the... Read More →
RF

Rebekah Farrugia

Rebekah Farrugia is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Communication and Journalism at Oakland University. Her book Beyond the Dance Floor: Female DJs, Technology and Electronic Dance Music will be published by Intellect Books in spring 2012.   Abstract: | | "'The Foundation' in Detroit: Challenging Conventional Ideologies about Sex and Gender in Hip Hop" Informed by ethnographic methods we examine a specific weekly hip hop... Read More →
CS

Carleton S. Gholz

President, Detroit Sound Conservancy


Friday March 23, 2012 4:00pm - 6:00pm
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

4:00pm

Roundtable: “Do You Want More?” The Time and Space of Alternative Sonic Blackness

The migration of sounds and ideas across time and place encourages synthesis; giving rise to avant garde, radical, and futurist voices. What (other) worlds open up and what (outer) spaces are formed? How do regional sites remix global flows? What factors/forces enable or prohibit certain voices from finding an audience in the national, global, or cyber scene? How do we reconcile organicism of sound, as musicians produce out of particular worlds, with the reckless and restless ways music circulates?

With: Kyle Dargan, Keith and Mendi Obadike, Jace Clayton (DJ Rupture), and the work of Barry Jenkins

Moderators: Jayna Brown, Daphne Brooks and Tavia Nyong’o


Speakers
DA

Daphne A. Brooks

Daphne A. Brooks is professor of English and African American Studies at Princeton University. She is the author of Bodies in Dissent: Spectacular Performances of Race and Freedom (Duke UP, 2006), Jeff Buckley’s Grace (Continuum, 2005), as well as the liner notes for Take A Look: Aretha Franklin Complete on Columbia and Come On and See Me: The Complete Tammi Terrell. She is currently at work on Subterranean Blues: Black Women and Sound... Read More →
JB

Jayna Brown

Jayna Brown is associate professor of Ethnic Studies at UC Riverside. She is the author of Babylon Girls: Black Women Performers and the Shaping of the Modern (Duke University Press, 2008), as well as numerous articles on race, gender, global sound and post-coloniality. She is also the co-editor of special issues of Social Text and Women and Performance. Her current projects focus on race, technology, and utopias in speculative fiction and global... Read More →
JC

Jace Clayton

Jace Clayton lives and works in New York City. Clayton uses an interdisciplinary approach to focus on how sound, memory, and public space interact, with an emphasis on low-income communities and the global South. His book on 21st century music and global digital culture will be published in 2016 by Farrar, Straus and Giroux. Recent projects include Sufi Plug Ins, a free suite of music software-as-art, based on non-western conceptions of sound and... Read More →
KD

Kyle Dargan

Kyle Dargan is the founder and editor of Post No Ills magazine and former managing editor of Callaloo. He is a co-editor, along with Deep Cotton\'s Chuck Lighting, of the forthcoming I Have a Scream anthology. He teaches literature and creative writing at American University in Washington, D.C.   Abstract: | | ""Do You Want More?" The Time and Space of Alternative Sonic Blackness" In 1961’s “Your Mama: 12 Moods for... Read More →
TN

Tavia Nyong'o

Tavia Nyong’o writes and teaches about performance, popular music, and cultural theory at New York University. His first book, The Amalgamation Waltz, came out in 2009. He is now working on a project about black aesthetics of the untimely. Abstract: | | "Shame and Scandal and Zombies" This talk begins in the first decade of the twenty first century, when the group Madness releases an album of classic ska and reggae tune to... Read More →
KM

Keith + Mendi Obadike

Mendi Obadike makes music, art and literature. Her and Keith Obadike's works include The Sour Thunder, an Internet opera (Bridge Records), Crosstalk : American Speech Music (Bridge Records), a suite of new media artworks, Black.Net.Art Actions (published in re : skin on M.I.T Press), Big House / Disclosure, a 200 hour public sound installation (Northwestern University), and a poetry collection, Armor and Flesh (Lotus Press). Mendi and... Read More →


Friday March 23, 2012 4:00pm - 6:00pm
The Global Center for Academic and Spiritual Life (GC) 238 Thompson Street, New York, NY 10012

6:15pm

Music Writers’ Gathering

Join us for a toast to music writing at this end of day gathering, which marks the book launch of Pop When the World Falls Apart: Music in the Shadow of Doubt and will include an editor’s call for submissions to The Journal of Popular Music Studies. Sponsored by Rock’s Backpages (www.rocksbackpages.com), along with Wiley-Blackwell and Duke University Press.


Friday March 23, 2012 6:15pm - 7:30pm
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

9:00pm

AFTER HOURS: Libation NYC: A Global Soul Dance Party featuring DJ Ian Friday

Acclaimed music historian Tim Lawrence, author of Loves Saves the Day: A History of American Dance Music Culture, calls New York dance party Libation “one of the few parties in New York where the sonically and socially progressive lineage that began with the Loft and carried on at parties such as the Gallery, the Paradise Garage, the Underground Network and Body & Soul lives on.” Ian Friday, Manchildblack, and Afro Mosaic Soul have teamed up with this conference to present a special evening of one of Gotham’s hottest underground dance parties: Libation (The Global Soul Experience). Resident mixologist Ian Friday (Global Soul Music) will spin a seamless set of deep, underground, soul-drenched music.

 

Admission: $10 for EMP/IASPM-US, $15 general



Friday March 23, 2012 9:00pm - Saturday March 24, 2012 4:00am
Sullivan Room 218 Sullivan Street NY 10012

10:30pm

AFTER HOURS: Poor Baby Bree presents Ragtime, Ragmen, and Ragamuffins: Historic Songs of the Lower East Side

 “Like being transported into another era. What an amazing performer!” -- Laurie Anderson

Join singer/archivist Bree Benton as Bowery waif “Poor Baby Bree” and musical director and frequent EMP presenter Franklin Bruno for a revue of comic and pathetic songs dating from the 1870s-1910s, the golden age of New York vaudeville. Hear songs by Irving Berlin (“Yiddle, With Your Fiddle, Play Some Ragtime”), variety impresario Tony Pastor (“In the Bowery”), Irish-American musical theater pioneers Harrigan & Hart (“The Market on Saturday Night”), and other rarely-performed numbers, reconstructed from original sheet music and songsters. With Franklin Bruno (piano), Karen Waltuch (viola), Jacob Garchik (tuba/trombone), and Nick Russo (banjo/mandolin). 60 minutes.

Please visit www.poorbabybree.com for more information and advance ticketing.

Admission at door: $8 for Pop Conference/IASPM-US attendees, $12 general


Speakers
FB

Franklin Bruno

Franklin Bruno is the author of Armed Forces, in Continuum’s 33 1/3 series; he is currently writing a book on popular song-form for Wesleyan University Press. His criticism has appeared in The Nation, Oxford American, The Believer, and two editions of Da Capo’s Best Music Writing annual. He has released 14 albums of original songs since 1990, solo and with the bands Nothing Painted Blue and (currently) Human Hearts. His most recent... Read More →


Friday March 23, 2012 10:30pm - 11:30pm
Bleecker St. Theater 45 Bleecker Street New York, NY 10012
 
Saturday, March 24
 

8:00am

Book Display

Books display (and coffee for participants) throughout day


Saturday March 24, 2012 8:00am - 5:00pm
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

8:00am

Registration

Saturday March 24, 2012 8:00am - 5:00pm
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

9:00am

West Coast Beats

Andreana Clay, “Feelin’ Mighty Real: Race, Space, and Identity in the Castro”

Dawn-Elissa Fischer, “Bay Area Hiphop Politics and Police”

Mako Fitts, “‘Third World Wide’: Transnational Narratives of Resistance Amidst Seattle’s Growth Machine”

Shana L. Redmond, “The Last Anthem: Police Power and the Prophesy
of Rebellion in L.A.”

Moderator: Deborah Vargas


Speakers
AC

Andreana Clay

Andreana Clay is an Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology at San Francisco State University. Her recent article, “Working Day and Night: Black Masculinity and the King of Pop,” was published in the Journal of Popular Music in March and her book, The Hip-Hop Generation Fights Back: Youth, Activism, and Post-Civil Rights Politics will be released in 2012 from NYU Press.   Abstract: | | "Feelin' Mighty Real: Race... Read More →
DF

Dawn-Elissa Fischer

Dawn-Elissa Fischer is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Africana Studies at SFSU, where she teaches courses on black popular culture, information technology and visual ethnography. As a Woodrow Wilson Fellow, she is completing two manuscripts entitled Blackness, Race and Gender Politics in Japanese Hiphop and Methods to Floss, Theories to Flow: Hiphop Research, Aesthetics and Activism. She co-directs the award-winning project BAHHRS... Read More →
MF

Mako Fitts

Mako Fitts is a Faculty Associate in the Department of Women and Gender Studies at Arizona State University. She is the co-founder of Women Who Rock: Making Scenes Building Communities, an annual Seattle-based conference of activists, scholars, musicians and artists that promote dialogue about women, music and social justice.   Abstract: | | ""Third World Wide": Transnational Narratives of Resistance Amidst Seattle's Growth... Read More →
SR

Shana Redmond

Shana L. Redmond is Assistant Professor of American Studies and Ethnicity at the University of Southern California. She is interested in black political cultures within the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.   Abstract: | | "The Last Anthem: Police Power and the Prophesy of Rebellion in L.A." In 1989 Spike Lee released his film Do the Right Thing, which captures the lead-up to and effects of urban unrest in segregated Brooklyn... Read More →
DV

Deborah Vargas

Deborah Vargas is Associate Professor in the Department of Chicano/Latino Studies at the University of California, Irvine. Her first book Dissonant Divas in Chicana Music: The Limits of La Onda is forthcoming from the University of Minnesota Press. Vargas has contributed oral histories of several singers she has researched for the Smithsonian Institution Latino Music Oral History Project.   Abstract: | | "Feminist and Queer Studies of... Read More →


Saturday March 24, 2012 9:00am - 11:00am
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

9:00am

The Hood Comes First?

Del F. Cowie, “Hardly Home, But Always Reppin’: The evolution of
Toronto’s Hip-Hop Sound”

Jason Lee Oakes,“’Who’s That? Brooown!’: Das Racist and the Queens Connection in International Hip Hop”

Justin D Burton, “Trillin in Harlem: The Unmistakable Crunkness of New York’s A$AP Rocky”

J. Griffith Rollefson, “’Ghettos du Monde’: Sounding the Ghetto from Paris to Berlin”

Moderator: Jalylah Burrell


Speakers
JB

Jalylah Burrell

Jalylah Burrell is a PhD student at Yale University in the departments of American Studies and African American Studies. She researches black women and humor. As a journalist and blogger, she contributed to Vibe, Fader, the Village Voice and the Portland Mercury among other publications. She has also worked as an oral historian beginning with the Spelman Independent Scholars (SIS) and continuing at the national oral history project StoryCorps.
JD

Justin D Burton

Justin Burton is a lecturer in music history at Rider, Rutgers, and Montclair State Universities. He specializes in posthuman hybridity in popular music, especially as it relates to black identity construction. Justin currently serves as the web editor for IASPM-US.   Abstract: | | "Trillin in Harlem: The Unmistakable Crunkness of New York's A$AP Rocky" In mid-2011, the internet, as it sometimes does, blew up—this time with buzz... Read More →
DF

Del F. Cowie

Del F. Cowie is a music journalist and online editor based in Toronto, Canada. He has been a member of the Polaris Music Prize jury since its 2006 inception, serving on its grand jury in 2010. He has written for CBC Music, AV Club Toronto, Vibe and XXL. He is currently an assistant editor at Canadian monthly music magazine Exclaim!   Abstract: | | "Hardly Home, But Always Reppin': The Evolution of Toronto's Hip-hop Sound" | To many... Read More →
JL

Jason Lee Oakes

Jason Lee Oakes received his Ph.D. in ethnomusicology from Columbia University in 2005. He has since taught classes at Columbia, John Jay College, Marymount Manhattan College, and, since 2008, the Cooper Union. His work on musical reenactments, tributes, impersonators, and karaoke has been published in several academic anthologies and journals.   Abstract: | | "'Who's That? Brooown!': Das Racist and the Queens Connection in... Read More →
JG

J. Griffith Rollefson

J. Griff Rollefson is ACLS New Faculty Fellow and Visiting Assistant Professor of Music at UC Berkeley where he teaches courses on global hip hop, jazz, and African American music. He has published in Black Music Research Journal, Popular Music and Society, Native Tongues: An African Hip-Hop Reader, and elsewhere.   Abstract: | | "'Ghettos du Monde': Sounding the Ghetto from Paris to Berlin" Drawing on recorded music and media as well as... Read More →


Saturday March 24, 2012 9:00am - 11:00am
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

9:00am

Berlin

S. Alexander Reed, “Industrial Music, Urban Squatting, and the Berlin Wall”

Jason King, “Berlin Outernational: The Weird/Wonderful Travels of George Kranz’s 1983 ‘Din Daa Daa’”

Alexander Weheliye, “White Brothers with No Soul? Technospaces in 1990’s Berlin”

Luis-Manuel Garcia, “BerMuDa in Berlin: Techno-Tourism, Music Scenes, and the Scale of Nightlife during the Berlin Music Days Weekend”

Moderator: David Grubbs


Speakers
LG

Luis-Manuel Garcia

Luis-Manuel Garcia is a postdoctoral fellow in the Berlin Program for Advanced German and European Studies at the Freie Universität. His postdoctoral research project is entitled, “The Techno Jetset: Mobility, Tourism, and Class in Berlin’s Electronic Dance Music Scenes.” He graduated from the University of Chicago in 2011 with a Ph.D. in Ethnomusicology.   Abstract: | | "BerMuDa in Berlin: Techno-Tourism, Music... Read More →
DG

David Grubbs

David Grubbs, associate professor in the Conservatory of Music at Brooklyn College, CUNY, has released eleven solo albums and is currently completing the book Records Ruin the Landscape: John Cage, The Sixties, and Sound Recording for Duke University Press. Grubbs is a grant recipient in Music/Sound from the Foundation for Contemporary Arts and is featured in Augusto Contento’s forthcoming documentary film Parallax Sounds.
JK

Jason King

(EMP Pop Conference Producer for Clive Davis Institute). Jason King is the Artistic Director of The Clive Davis Institute of Recorded Music, an innovative leadership institute for aspiring young music entrepreneurs at Tisch School of the Arts, NYU - and its founding faculty member. He has been a pop music critic for magazines like Vibe and Blender as well as a producer and manager. He is the author of The Michael Jackson Treasures and Blue... Read More →
SA

S. Alexander Reed

S. Alexander Reed is assistant professor of music at the University of Florida. His book Assimilate: A Critical History of Industrial Music (Oxford University Press) is forthcoming. He has recorded and toured extensively with his industrial band, ThouShaltNot. Reed is chair of the American Musicological Society\'s Popular Music Study Group.   Abstract: | | "Industrial Music, Urban Squatting, and the Berlin Wall" Early German industrial... Read More →
AG

Alexander G. Weheliye

Alexander G. Weheliye is associate professor of African American Studies and English at Northwestern University where he teaches black literature and culture, critical theory, social technologies, and popular culture. He is the author of Phonographies: Grooves in Sonic Afro-Modernity (Duke University Press, 2005).   Abstract: | | "White Brothers With No Soul? Technospaces in 1990's Berlin" While the reception of Detroit techno in... Read More →


Saturday March 24, 2012 9:00am - 11:00am
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

9:00am

Metal Studies Rising

Esther Clinton, “The Gothic Menace, Then and Now: Gothic Literature, Heavy Metal Music, and Moral Panics”

Eric Smialek, “How Does Metal Mean? Ways that Musicology Can Contribute to Metal Studies”

Amber R. Clifford-Napoleone, “Hell Bent for Metal: A Study of Queer Fans of Heavy Metal”

Nelson Varas-Díaz & Eliut R. Rivera-Segarra, “Heavy Metal music in the Caribbean Setting: Social Practices and Meanings of Music at the Periphery”

Moderator: Jeremy Wallach


Speakers
AR

Amber R. Clifford-Napoleone

Amber R. Clifford-Napoleone is an anthropologist and scholar of cultural studies, specializing in gender, sexuality and queerness in the spaces of music scenes. She is Assistant Professor of Anthropology and Curator of Collections at University of Central Missouri. Dr. Clifford-Napoleone is also a member of the IASPM-US Diversity Committee.   Abstract: | | "Hell Bent for Metal: A Study of Queer Fans of Heavy Metal" Much of the... Read More →
EC

Esther Clinton

Esther Clinton received her PhD in folklore from Indiana University in 2005. She has been employed in the Popular Culture department at Bowling Green State University in Bowling Green, Ohio, since 2006. Her wide research interests include narrative theory, gothic literature, heavy metal music, and the works of J.R.R. Tolkien.   Abstract: | | "The Gothic Menace, Then and Now: Gothic Literature, Heavy Metal Music, and Moral Panics" Early... Read More →
ES

Eric Smialek

Eric Smialek is a doctoral student in musicology at McGill University where he studies extreme metal by combining the study of fan discourses with close music analysis. Eric holds a doctoral fellowship from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada and has recently been elected as IASPM-Canada’s graduate student representative.   Abstract: | | "How Does Metal Mean? Ways that Musicology Can Contribute to Metal... Read More →
NV

Nelson Varas-Diaz

Nelson Varas-Díaz is a social psychologist and an Associate Professor at the University of Puerto Rico. He has previously published peer-reviewed articles and books on social stigma and communal identities. He has recently engaged in the field of Heavy Metal Studies and published a book chapter on the contributions of progressive metal of social stigma theory.   Abstract: | | "Heavy Metal music in the Caribbean Setting: Social... Read More →
JW

Jeremy Wallach

Jeremy Wallach is author of Modern Noise, Fluid Genres: Popular Music in Indonesia, 1997-2001 (2008) and co-editor of Metal Rules the Globe: Heavy Metal Music around the World (2012). A cultural anthropologist and ethnomusicologist, he is an associate professor in the Department of Popular Culture at Bowling Green State University.   Abstract: | | "Pluralism vs. Islamic Fundamentalism in Jakarta's Extreme Metal Scene" For most of its... Read More →


Saturday March 24, 2012 9:00am - 11:00am
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

9:00am

Beauty, Noise, and the Canon

Barry Shank, “All Your Rock Critic Friends Think Brian Wilson
Must Have Died”

Kevin Fellezs, “Another Song: Contemplating Karen Carpenter’s
Suburban Soul Music and An Aesthetics of Mainstream Pop”

Kevin Gaines, “Beyond Soul: The Case of Stevie Wonder, Jazz-Pop, and Music that will Last Forever”

Jessica Wood, “Noise and the Canon: The Meaning of Classical Music
in Late-1960s Rock”

Moderator: Andrew Bienen


Speakers
AB

Andrew Bienen

Columbia University Andrew Bienen is the co-writer of the Academy Award winning movie, Boys Don’t Cry. He is an Associate Professor of Screenwriting at Columbia University’s Graduate Film Division and has also taught at La Femis (Paris), New York University, and the New School. He has an MFA in Screenwriting from Columbia, and an M.A. in English from the University of Virginia. He has written screenplays for Dreamworks and New Line Cinema... Read More →
KF

Kevin Fellezs

Kevin Fellezs is assistant professor of Music with an appointment in the Institute for Research in African-American Studies at Columbia University. He earned his PhD in History of Consciousness from UC Santa Cruz in 2004. He is the author of Birds of Fire: Jazz, Rock, Funk and the Creation of Fusion Music (Duke, 2011) and of several articles on black-Asian musical exchanges.   Abstract: | | "Another Song: Contemplating Karen Carpenter's... Read More →
KG

Kevin Gaines

Kevin Gaines is the Robert Hayden Collegiate Professor of History and Afroamerican and African Studies, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, at the University of Michigan. He is author of Uplifting the Race: Black Leadership, Politics, and Culture During the Twentieth Century (University of North Carolina Press, 1996), and American Africans in Ghana: Black Expatriates and the Civil Rights Era (UNC Press, 2006).   Abstract... Read More →
BS

Barry Shank

Barry Shank teaches in the department of Comparative Studies at Ohio State University. He is author of Dissonant Identities: The Rock ‘n’ Roll Scene in Austin, Texas and A Token of My Affection: Greeting Cards and American Business Culture. Currently serving as President of the U.S. branch of the International Association for the Study of Popular music, he is completing a book for Duke University Press entitled “Silence... Read More →
JW

Jessica Wood

Jessica Wood received a PhD in Musicology from Duke University, defending a dissertation on the post-World War II significance of the harpsichord, which is now being revised for book publication. She teaches classes on popular music at Duke, where she also works as a reference archivist at the Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library.   Abstract: | | "Noise and the Canon: The Meaning of Classical Music in Late-1960s Rock" During the... Read More →


Saturday March 24, 2012 9:00am - 11:00am
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

9:00am

Roundtable: Where is the City? Where is the Scene?

With the internet, some urban spaces devoted to interaction around music are changing and even disappearing. Do internet-mediated musics like chillwave implode the notion of the urban, and, more generally, the local? Participants in this roundtable will discuss the dynamics of recent urban scenes, virtual communities of shared aesthetics, the movement of American artists and media from local scenes to global centers, and the changing notions of “place” in a world of home-based and mobile media.

With: Kyle Barnett, Paula Carino, Wendy Fonarow, Will Hermes, and Mark Richardson

Moderator: Holly Kruse


Speakers
KB

Kyle Barnett

Kyle Barnett is an Assistant Professor of Communication at Bellarmine University and a research fellow at Bellarmine\'s Institute for Media, Culture, and Ethics. He studies cultural production and genre formation in the recording industry, and his research on popular music includes publications in the Journal of Popular Music Studies and the Convergence Media History anthology. Abstract: | | "Where is the City? Where is the Scene?" City... Read More →
PC

Paula Carino

Paula Carino is a Brooklyn-based singer-songwriter and author. In the 1990s, she led the power-pop band Regular Einstein, and she has been performing solo since the early 2000s. Her album “Open on Sunday” was named best album of 2010 by Lucid Culture. She is the author of the book Yoga to Go (Sterling, 2004) Abstract: | | "Where is the City? Where is the Scene?" City music scenes enjoyed attention from the popular media and... Read More →
WF

Wendy Fonarow

Wendy Fonarow is Associate Professor of Anthropology at Glendale College, specializing in live music, ritual and performance. She has worked in A&R and as an industry consultant in the US and UK, and is author of the series “Ask the Indie Professor” for The Guardian. Her book Empire of Dirt, about British indie music, is published by Wesleyan University Press.   Abstract: | | "Where is the City? Where is the... Read More →
WH

Will Hermes

Will Hermes is a senior critic for Rolling Stone and a contributor to NPR’s “All Things Considered.” He has written for The New York Times, Spin, the Village Voice, GQ, Salon, and Entertainment Weekly. His book Love Goes to Buildings on Fire was published in 2011, and he co-edited SPIN: 20 Years of Alternative Music.   "Where is the City? Where is the Scene?" City music scenes enjoyed attention from the popular media and... Read More →
HK

Holly Kruse

Rogers State University
Holly Kruse is a communication professor at Rogers State University and researches communication technology, social formations, and social interaction. She is the author of the book Site and Sound: Understanding Independent Music Scenes as well as many scholarly journal articles and book chapters on popular music, identity, gender, and geography.   Abstract: | | "Where is the City? Where is the Scene?" City music scenes enjoyed... Read More →


Saturday March 24, 2012 9:00am - 11:00am
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

9:00am

Roundtable: Musical Crossroads: Framing the Story of African American Music in a National Museum

In 2015, the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture will open on the National Mall in Washington, DC. This roundtable panel will discuss how regional variation and the impact of urbanization and migration on the history of African American music should be addressed in the museum’s exhibitions.

With: Chuck D., Dwan Reece, Kevin Strait, and Timothy Anne Burnside

Moderator: Dwan Reece


Speakers
TA

Timothy Anne Burnside

Timothy Anne Burnside is a Project Researcher at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture. She works closely with artists to build collections that offer accurate and rich representations of African American cultural expression. Timothy studied History, English, and Music Performance at Lawrence University.   Abstract: | | "Musical Crossroads: Framing the Story of African American Music in a National... Read More →
CD

Chuck D

Chuck D, a native of Queens, was instrumental in creating politically and socially conscious rap and hip-hop as leader of the group, Public Enemy. Throughout the 1980\'s and 1990\'s Public Enemy saw a string of hit singles and albums including Yo! Bum Rush the Show, It Takes a Nation of Millions to Hold Us Back, Fear of a Black Planet, and Apocalypse 91..... The Enemy Strkes Back. 2012 marks the group\'s 25th anniversary.
DR

Dwan Reece

Dwan Reece is Curator of Music and Performing Arts at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History Culture.. Along with building the museum’s collections and developing programs, she is curator of the Museum’s inaugural music exhibition, Musical Crossroads. Dwan received her Ph.D. in Performance Studies from New York University.   Abstract: | | "Musical Crossroads: Framing the Story of African American... Read More →
KS

Kevin Strait

Kevin Strait is a Project Historian at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History Culture. He works closely with curators on the research, development and acquisition of objects for several of the museum’s permanent exhibitions. Kevin received his Ph.D. in American Studies at the George Washington University.   Abstract: | | "Musical Crossroads: Framing the Story of African American Music in a National... Read More →


Saturday March 24, 2012 9:00am - 11:00am
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

11:15am

Sexuality and the City

Philip Gentry, “The Erotics of Chance”

Emily Tartanella, “’A Country Mile Behind the World’: A Smithsian sense of place”

Elias Krell, “Singing the Contours of the City: Transvocality and
Affect in Lucas Silveira’s Toronto”

Moderator: Franklin Bruno


Speakers
FB

Franklin Bruno

Franklin Bruno is the author of Armed Forces, in Continuum’s 33 1/3 series; he is currently writing a book on popular song-form for Wesleyan University Press. His criticism has appeared in The Nation, Oxford American, The Believer, and two editions of Da Capo’s Best Music Writing annual. He has released 14 albums of original songs since 1990, solo and with the bands Nothing Painted Blue and (currently) Human Hearts. His most recent... Read More →
PG

Philip Gentry

Philip Gentry teaches music history at the University of Delaware. His research focuses on American music at mid-century, with interests in performance historiography, the cultural practice of identity politics, and queer theory. He is currently working on a monograph that explores music-making in the United States during McCarthyism. Abstract: | | "The Erotics of Chance" “Life is at its most rewarding,” writes Samuel Delaney... Read More →
EK

Elias Krell

Elias Krell is a doctoral candidate in Performance Studies at Northwestern University. He received a Masters in Music and sang opera professionally for three years. His dissertation project, "Singing Strange: Transvocality in American Music Performance" explores the ways in which transgender and gender variant musicians in the Americas perform identities that move against normative or linear narratives through the voice in music... Read More →
ET

Emily Tartanella

Emily Tartanella is a freelance writer and educator, specializing in the intersections between film, music, and literature, as well queer and gender studies. Her work has appeared in the Philadelphia Inquirer, Spin, and The Village Voice. She is currently working on an examination of homoerotic images in rock and roll.   Abstract: | | "'A Country Mile Behind the World': A Smithsian Sense of Place " The Smiths were one of the most... Read More →


Saturday March 24, 2012 11:15am - 12:45am
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

11:15am

Preserving Soundscapes

Matthew Hayes, “Preserving America’s Endangered Soundscapes: An Emerging Field in Historic Preservation”

Barrett Martin, “Preserving Musical Memory: Physical Space and dSocio-Economic-Cultural Identity”

Devon Powers, “Writing Music (Into) History”

Moderator: Laura Lavernia


Speakers
MH

Matthew Hayes

Matthew Hayes recently graduated from the Savannah College of Art and Design with a master’s degree in historic preservation. He has presented aspects of his research at a variety of conferences dedicated to architecture, preservation and art history; these include the recent annual conferences of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, the Association for Preservation Technology International, and the Society of Industrial... Read More →
LL

Laura Lavernia

Laura Lavernia, MAAA, MAHP holds master’s degrees in Arts Administration and Historic Preservation from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and the Savannah College of Art and Design. Born in Havana, Cuba and raised in Miami, Laura has utilized her interdisciplinary background in art history and anthropology to pursue research in Caribbean and Afro-Cuban soundscapes, focusing primarily on the varied sonic heritage of exiled Cuban... Read More →
BM

Barrett Martin

Barrett Martin, MA is an American drummer (Skin Yard, Screaming Trees, and Mad Season), composer and producer. After earning his master's degree in anthropology, linguistics, and ethnomusicology from the University Of New Mexico, he was appointed adjunct professor in the Liberal Arts Department at Antioch University, Seattle, Washington.   Abstract: | | "Preserving Musical Memory: Physical Space and Socio-Economic-Cultural... Read More →
DP

Devon Powers

Devon Powers, PhD, is Assistant Professor of Culture and Communication, Drexel University. Her research interests include popular music, promotional culture, and music journalism. She is currently completing a book about the rock criticism of the Village Voice, to be published in 2013 by University of Massachusetts Press.   Abstract: | | "Writing Music (Into) History" Journalism is often referred to as the first draft of history... Read More →


Saturday March 24, 2012 11:15am - 12:45pm
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

11:15am

Street Dreams: Blackness on the Move

Adrienne Brown, “Rehearing Hip-Hop Automotivity”

Francisco Robles, “’This bitter earth may not be so bitter after all’:
Political Promise and Sonic Geography in Killer of Sheep and We Insist! Max Roach’s Freedom Now Suite

Sonya Posmentier, “City Streets, Country Roads: Zora Neale Hurston’s Moving Sound”

Moderator: Alexandra T. Vazquez


Speakers
AB

Adrienne Brown

Adrienne Brown is an Assistant Professor of English at the University of Chicago. Her work analyzes the sonic and spatial dimensions of books, buildings, and forms of belonging. She is working on a book recovering the skyscraper’s central role in American social and aesthetic perception in the early 20th century. Her article on music in HBO’s The Wire was published in Criticism this summer.   Abstract: | | "Rehearing Hip-Hop... Read More →
SP

Sonya Posmentier

Sonya Posmentier is a PhD candidate in the Department of English at Princeton University. Her dissertation, Cultivation and Catastrophe, explores poetic, musical, and visual responses to social and environmental disaster, from Claude McKay to Bessie Smith to Treme. Her work is forthcoming in American Literature.   Abstract: | | "City Streets, Country Roads: Zora Neale Hurston's Moving Sound" What does catastrophe sound like? Musicians... Read More →
FR

Francisco Robles

Francisco E. Robles is a PhD candidate in Princeton University’s English Department. His dissertation delves into the democratic methodologies, radical representational tactics, and musical styles of Odetta, Lydia Mendoza, and Woody Guthrie, exploring how they enable readers to rehear(se) political praxis in works by Zora Neale Hurston, John Steinbeck, Sandra Cisneros, and Toni Morrison.   Abstract: | | "'This bitter earth may... Read More →
AT

Alexandra T. Vazquez

Alexandra T. Vazquez is an assistant professor in the Center for African American Studies and the Department of English at Princeton University. She is the author of Listening in Detail: Performances of Cuban Music and, with Ela Troyano, a coeditor of La Lupe: Queen of Latin Soul. She has published in women and performance, The Journal for Popular Music Studies, Social Text, and the books Reggaeton and Pop When the World Falls... Read More →


Saturday March 24, 2012 11:15am - 12:45pm
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

11:15am

Urbanized Faith

Mark Burford, “Swing Low: The Rise and Fall of the Sweet Chariot”

Christina Zanfagna, “’Earthquake Music’: The Cataclysmic Landscapes and Soundscapes of Holy Hip Hop”

Danielle Brown, “‘Leroy, Where Yuh Mudda Gone’: Language, Gender, and the Urbanization of Trinidad Parang Music”

Moderator: Gregory Erickson


Speakers
DB

Danielle Brown

Danielle Brown earned a doctorate in Music from New York University with a concentration in ethnomusicology, and a specialization in the music of Latin America and the Caribbean. She is an active vocalist and cuatro player, and composes and performs jazz and Latin American and Caribbean-based musics in New York. "'Leroy, Where Yuh Mudda Gone': Language, Gender, and the Urbanization of Trinidad Parang Music " The twin-island nation of Trinidad... Read More →
MB

Mark Burford

Mark Burford is Assistant Professor of Music at Reed College. His work on European art music and popular music of the Americas has been published in various journals and edited collections. His current research focuses on the circulation and reception of black gospel singing within U.S. popular culture during the 1950s and early 1960s.   Abstract: | | "Swing Low: The Rise and Fall of the Sweet Chariot" In June 1963, Mahalia Jackson... Read More →
GE

Gregory Erickson

Gregory Erickson is an Associate Professor of Interdisciplinary Studies at the Gallatin School of New York University where he teaches courses on religion, literature, music, and popular culture, and is the chair of the Writing Program. He is the author of The Absence of God in Modernist Literature and of Religion and Popular Culture: Rescripting the Sacred. He is also a professional trombonist.
CZ

Christina Zanfagna

Christina Zanfagna is an Assistant Professor of Ethnomusicology at Santa Clara University. Her research on Holy Hip Hop was recently published in Black Music Research Journal. She has worked for Afropop Worldwide, San Quentin’s Prison University Project, and the Mosaic Multicultural Foundation. She performs flamenco dance throughout the Bay Area.   Abstract: | | "'Earthquake Music': The Cataclysmic Landscapes and Soundscapes of Holy... Read More →


Saturday March 24, 2012 11:15am - 12:45pm
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

11:15am

Metal Mimesis

Jeremy Wallach, “Pluralism vs. Islamic Fundamentalism in Jakarta’s Extreme Metal Scene”

Aliza Shvarts, “Mimesis, Metal, and the Politics of Doom”

J.D. Considine, “Tokyo Style Wars: Death Metal, Shibuya-kei and Social Status in Detroit Metal City

Moderator: Mark Spicer


Speakers
JC

J.D. Considine

J.D. Considine is a critic, musician and recovering otaku. He is jazz critic at The Globe and Mail, and writes for Revolver, Bass Player and Downbeat.   Abstract: | | "Tokyo Style Wars: Death metal, Shibuya-kei and Social Status in Detroit Metal City" Kiminori Wakasugi’s manga Detroit Rock City is in many ways a standard fish-out-of-water story. Soichi Negishi, a hapless naif from rural Japan, moves to Tokyo to pursue a career in... Read More →
AS

Aliza Shvarts

Aliza Shvarts is a PhD candidate in Performance Studies at NYU, where she writes on figuration and failure. Her artwork, which achieved brief infamy when she was an undergraduate at Yale, explored similar themes. Currently, she is a managing editor of the performance studies journal TDR/The Drama Review.   Abstract: | | "Mimesis, Metal, and the Politics of Doom" Among some of the longer haired people I know, a question circulates that... Read More →
JW

Jeremy Wallach

Jeremy Wallach is author of Modern Noise, Fluid Genres: Popular Music in Indonesia, 1997-2001 (2008) and co-editor of Metal Rules the Globe: Heavy Metal Music around the World (2012). A cultural anthropologist and ethnomusicologist, he is an associate professor in the Department of Popular Culture at Bowling Green State University.   Abstract: | | "Pluralism vs. Islamic Fundamentalism in Jakarta's Extreme Metal Scene" For most of its... Read More →


Saturday March 24, 2012 11:15am - 12:45pm
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

11:15am

SOTC: First Edition

Dave Laing, “Charlie Gillett: Sound Citizen of London”

Robert Christgau, “The Original Sound of the City: How Charlie Gillett Named This Conference”

Charlie McGovern, “’Up in the Streets of Harlem’: Black Vocal Groups and Postwar Urban Life”

Moderator: Karl Hagstrom Miller


Speakers
RC

Robert Christgau

Robert Christgau's msn.com record blog is called Expert Witness. His Rock & Roll & column appears at The Barnes & Noble Review. He is a critic at NPR's All Things Considered. He teaches in NYU's Clive Davis Department of Recorded Music. He has published five books based on his journalism. He keynoted the first EMP and has spoken at every subsequent edition.   Abstract: | | "The Original Sound of the City: How Charlie Gillett... Read More →
DL

Dave Laing

Dave Laing is Visiting Research Fellow at the Institute of Popular Music, University of Liverpool and a journalist, editor and lecturer. His books include The Sound of Our Time (1970), One Chord Wonders (1985), and The Da Capo Companion to 20th Century Popular Music (1990,with Phil Hardy) and Buddy Holly (2010).   Abstract: | | "Charlie Gillett – Sound Citizen of London" The author of The Sound of the City was based in London... Read More →
CM

Charlie McGovern

Charlie McGovern teaches American studies and History at William and Mary in Williamsburg, VA. He wrote Sold American Consumption and Citizenship in American Life, 1890-1945, and he co-founded the Duke University Press series Refiguring American Music. He’s working on a book on pop music, race and citizenship, along with a shorter project on Nat Cole.   Abstract: | | "'Up in the Streets of Harlem': Black Vocal Groups and Postwar... Read More →
KH

Karl Hagstrom Miller

Karl Hagstrom Miller is Associate Professor of History at the University of Texas at Austin. He is the author of Segregating Sound: Inventing Folk and Pop Music in the Age of Jim Crow (Duke). He is currently writing a book about the history of amateur participation in commercial pop music. |   | Abstract: | | "I am Sitting in a Room: The Private Pop Experience" | Alone in a room with music--reverberations fill the space. The outside... Read More →


Saturday March 24, 2012 11:15am - 12:45pm
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

11:15am

Roundtable: Violence Girl: East L.A. Rage to Hollywood Stage, A Chicana Punk Story—A D.I.Y. “Archiverista” Conversation

This roundtable highlights Alice Bag’s new memoir. Violence Girl
seizes the opportunity to explore within the Hollywood punk scene the
relationship between women and the city and the relevance of Alice’s East L.A. community in her music making. With Alice accompanied by her guitar, the roundtable considers the 1970s Hollywood punk scene as a vehicle for entering, if temporarily, segregated social spaces, and as a space that nurtured a feminist-inspired humor as social critique.

With: Alice “Bag” Velasquez, Michelle Habell-Pallán
and Sean Carrillo

Moderator: Bibbe Hansen


Speakers
SC

Sean Carrillo

East Los Angeles native Sean Carrillo was a member of the legendary art group Asco. Together with Warhol superstar wife Bibbe Hansen, he owned and operated the respected multicultural performance space Troy Cafe. He now lives in New York City where he creates visual art writes on art and culture.   Abstract: | | "Violence Girl: East L.A. Rage to Hollywood Stage, A Chicana Punk Story -- a D.I.Y. "Archiverista" Conversation" This... Read More →
MH

Michelle Habell-Pallán

Michelle Habell-Pallán, a professor in Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies at the University of Washington, authored Loca Motion: The Travels of Chicana/Latina Popular Culture, guest-curated "American Sabor: Latinos in U.S. Popular Music", co-facilitates the Women Who Rock Research and Digital Oral History Project and jams with Seattle Fandango Project. Abstract: | | "Violence Girl: East L.A. Rage to Hollywood Stage, A Chicana Punk... Read More →
BH

Bibbe Hansen

Bibbe Hansen, grew up in the art/music underground of 1960’s NY. The youngest of the Warhol superstars, she recorded a single with Jack Kerouac’s daughter Jan when she was thirteen and she continues to perform internationally, most recently at the Barcelona International Poetry Festival and All Tomorrow’s Parties music festival.
AV

Alice Velasquez

Born Alicia Armendariz, Alice Velasquez was the lead singer of The Bags, the first female-fronted punk band to play the Masque, the underground club that was ground zero for the Hollywood punk scene during the 1977 West Coast punk revolution. She\'s performed with Castration Squad, Cholita, Quetzal, and numerous others. www.alicebag.com.   Abstract: | | "Violence Girl: East L.A. Rage to Hollywood Stage, A Chicana Punk Story -- a D.I.Y... Read More →


Saturday March 24, 2012 11:15am - 12:45pm
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

12:45pm

Vidas Perfectas: El Parque

This event contributes to the dialogue about Sounds of the City performatively, with a live, low-tech concert performance of “El Parque,” a half-hour episode from Vidas Perfectas, the Spanish-language version of Robert Ashley’s landmark work Perfect Lives (1977-1983). This all-new version features Ned Sublette, Elio Villafranca, Peter Gordon, Elisa Santiago, and Abraham Gómez Delgado, in the roles originally performed by Robert Ashley, “Blue” Gene Tyranny, Peter Gordon, Jill Kroesen and David van Tieghem, respectively.

With: Ned Sublette, Elio Villafranca, Peter Gordon, Elisa Santiago, and Abraham Gómez Delgado


Speakers
AG

Abraham Gomez Delgado

Abraham Gomez-Delgado is a composer, multi-instrumentalist, vocalist and performance artist of Peruvian descent. A native of Puerto Rico, he now leads the experimental Latin music group Zemog el Gallo Bueno, co-leads the Positive Catastrophe and has a performance art group named Eje in the US. He teaches sound art and production at Bloomfield College, New Jersey and was recently awarded the New Jazz Works grant from Chamber Music America and... Read More →
PG

Peter Gordon

Peter Gordon first gained attention in New York in the late 1970s with his Love of Life Orchestra (LOLO). He has composed large-scale scores for collaborations in theater, dance, film and video, including Robert Ashley’s Perfect Lives. His recordings include Star Jaws, Extended Niceties, Geneva, Casino, Innocent and Brooklyn, Leningrad Express, Love of Life Orchestra: Quartet, The Yellow Box (with David Cunningham) and the retrospective... Read More →
ES

Elisa Santiago

Elisa Santiago danced professionally in Spain for several years before receiving her BA in choreography at The School for New Dance Development in Amsterdam in 2003. There she met Voin de Voin, with whom she made performance installation pieces under the name of Kangaroo Productions Presents. Their collaboration involved other artists and several media. Their work was presented at Ellen de Bruijne Gallery (Amsterdam), Frascati Theater... Read More →
NS

Ned Sublette

Ned Sublette is a singer-songwriter and author. He has published three books: Cuba and Its Music: From the First Drums to the Mambo, The World that Made New Orleans: From Spanish Silver to Congo Square, and The Year Before the Flood. His albums include Kiss You Down South (forthcoming), Cowboy Rumba (Palm Pictures) and, in collaboration with Lawrence Weiner, Monsters from the Deep and Ships at Sea, Sailors and Shoes... Read More →
EV

Elio Villafranca

Elio Villafranca was classically trained in percussion and composition at the Instituto Superior de Arte in Havana, Cuba before his arrival in the U.S. in late 1995. Resident professor at Temple University, he is at the forefront of the latest generation of remarkable Cuban pianists, composers and bandleaders making major creative contributions to the international development of modern jazz. He has released three albums as a bandleader, most... Read More →


Saturday March 24, 2012 12:45pm - 1:30pm
Rosenthal Pavilion, 10th Floor 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY

12:45pm

Lunch Break

FOOD AND DRINK

The Market Place at the Kimmel Center offers a variety of international and traditional dining choices including:

The Italian Market

Faye’s Deli

Habanero Mexican

Halal

Yolato Frozen Yogurt


Saturday March 24, 2012 12:45pm - 1:30pm
Break

1:00pm

Minneapolis Royalty: Prince

Matt Thomas, “From Counterculture 2 Cyberculture and Back Again”
Zaheer Ali, “MPLS (Minneapolis): As Site and Sound”

Moderator: Adam Sexton


Speakers
ZA

Zaheer Ali

Zaheer Ali is a Ph.D. candidate in history at Columbia University where he focuses on 20th century African American history, with a focus on religion, politics, and culture. He is interested in the intersections of geography and history, in particular the role of space and place in shaping the past. Abstract: | | "MPLS (Minneapolis): As Site and Sound" By his 1982 release 1999, Prince had consolidated all the sonic elements that would come... Read More →
AS

Adam Sexton

Adam Sexton is Associate Director of Arts, Humanities, and Writing at NYU’s School of Continuing and Professional Studies. His books include Rap on Rap and Desperately Seeking Madonna, and he has written on music for the New York Times, Village Voice, and Boston Phoenix.
MT

Matt Thomas

Born and raised in Seattle, Matt Thomas received a B.A. in American Studies from the University of Southern California in 2003. He is currently a Ph.D. candidate in American Studies at the University of Iowa working on a dissertation about life hacking. Abstract: | | "From Counterculture 2 Cyberculture and Back Again" For much of his career, Prince openly fantasied about panracial and pansexual utopia. The 1980 song "Uptown," for instance... Read More →


Saturday March 24, 2012 1:00pm - 2:00pm
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

2:15pm

Roundtable: Newark’s Finest: Reflections on Whitney Houston

Whitney Houston’s engrossing “homegoing” funeral service was a potent reminder of her local New Jersey roots and instantiation in traditional black Baptist gospel ritual, even as the service itself drove home how global, hybrid and ubiquitous her cross-over approach to superstardom had been. This roundtable considers the impact of Whitney Houston on singing, on music styles and formats, and on the business itself; and her contribution to the way we think about race, gender, class, and post-civil rights / post-soul politics.

With: Nelson George, Michael A. Gonzales, Margo Jefferson,
Scott Poulson-Bryant, and Danyel Smith

Moderator: Jason King


Speakers
NG

Nelson George

Nelson George is a author/filmmaker who documents and celebrates the black experience in America. Nelson has written the critically acclaimed music histories The Death of Rhythm & Blues and Hip Hop America, plus the current music themed novel The Plot Against Hip Hop. He directed the HBO telefilm Life Support that starred Queen Latifah. He also has two documentaries on national cable channels this spring: Brooklyn Boheme on Showtime and The... Read More →
MA

Michael A. Gonzales

Michael A. Gonzales has written cover stories for Wax Poetics, Vibe, One More Robot, The London Telegraph, XXL, Stop Smiling and The Source. His essays have been cited in Da Capo Best Music Writing 2008, 2009 and 2010. In addition, he blogs about pop culture @ Blackadelicpop.blogspot.com and lives in Brooklyn.
MJ

Margo Jefferson

Margo Jefferson is a cultural critic and the author of On Michael Jackson (Vintage). She was a staff writer for The New York Times for 12 years, and received a Pulitzer Prize in 1995. Her reviews and essays have appeared in Bookforum, The Washington Post, New York Magazine, Grand Street, The Nation, and Ms. Currently, she teaches writing at Columbia University and Eugene Lang College.
JK

Jason King

(EMP Pop Conference Producer for Clive Davis Institute). Jason King is the Artistic Director of The Clive Davis Institute of Recorded Music, an innovative leadership institute for aspiring young music entrepreneurs at Tisch School of the Arts, NYU - and its founding faculty member. He has been a pop music critic for magazines like Vibe and Blender as well as a producer and manager. He is the author of The Michael Jackson Treasures and Blue... Read More →
SP

Scott Poulson-Bryant

Scott Poulson-Bryant is a doctoral candidate in Harvard’s History of American Civilization program, where he is working on a dissertation analyzing performances of race and gender in 1970s African American musicals. One of the co-founding editors of VIBE magazine, his books include HUNG: A Meditation on the Measure of Black Men in America (Doubleday, 2006) and The VIPs: a Novel (Broadway Books, 2011).
avatar for Danyel Smith

Danyel Smith

Culture Lead, ESPN
Danyel Smith is culture lead at ESPN’s “The Undefeated.” She is a 2013-14 John S. Knight Journalism Fellow at Stanford University, and has served as editor of Billboard, editor-at-large at Time Inc. and as editor-in-chief of VIBE. Danyel is co-founder of HRDCVR, a design-centered hardcover media project created by diverse teams for a diverse world. She has written for ESPN The Magazine, The Guardian, NPR, CNN, Rolling Stone... Read More →


Saturday March 24, 2012 2:15pm - 3:45pm
Rosenthal Pavilion, 10th Floor 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY

2:15pm

Black Manhattan

David Gilbert, “The Unlikely Musical Gumbo of Black Manhattan before World War I: James Reese Europe’s Syncopated Symphony Orchestras at Carnegie Hall”

Clarence Bernard Henry, “The Sounds of ‘Black Swan,’ A New York City Icon in Early Recording History”

Cookie Woolner, “’Ethel Must Not Marry’: Black Swan Records and the Queer Classic Blues Women”

Moderator: Jody Rosen


Speakers
DG

David Gilbert

David Gilbert received a PhD in U.S. history at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in May 2011. He is an affiliated scholar at Kenyon College working on a book manuscript entitled The Product of Our Souls: Ragtime, Race, and the Marketplace in James Reese Europe’s New York.   Abstract: | | "The Unlikely Musical Gumbo of Black Manhattan before World War I: James Reese Europe's Syncopated Symphony Orchestras at Carnegie Hall" In... Read More →
CB

Clarence Bernard Henry

Clarence Bernard Henry is currently the director of The Henry Center for Multicultural Education & Global Research, a non-profit organization that is located in New York City. He received a Ph.D. in Ethnomusicology from the University of California, Los Angeles. Henry is also the author of the book, Let’s Make Some Noise: Axé and the African Roots of Brazilian Popular Music (2008, University Press of... Read More →
JR

Jody Rosen

Jody Rosen is the music critic for Slate, the author of White Christmas: The Story of an American Song, and the compiler of Jewface, an anthology of early 20th century Jewish novelty recordings.   Abstract: | | "'Darktown Strutters' Ball': Shelton Brooks' Chocolate City" When the songwriter Shelton Brooks published “Darktown Strutters’ Ball” in 1917, it was an instant hit—a dancehall rave-up for a transitional... Read More →
CW

Cookie Woolner

Cookie Woolner is a Ph.D. candidate in History and Women’s Studies at the University of Michigan. She is currently a Martin Duberman Visiting Scholar at the New York Public Library. Her dissertation is entitled, The Famous Lady Lovers: Race, Sexuality and the Entertainment Industry in the World of the Classic Blues Women, 1890-1940.   Abstract: | | "'Ethel Must Not Marry': Black Swan Records and the Queer Classic Blues Women" In... Read More →


Saturday March 24, 2012 2:15pm - 3:45pm
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

2:15pm

Gentrification

Kemi Adeyemi, “Hipster Soul: Sonic Blackness and the Gentrifying City”

Molly McGlone, “The Sounds of Philadelphia: Examining the Creative Economy in a Post-Industrial City”

Fabian Holt, “How Live Music Clubs in New York City Have Adapted to Gentrification: The Case of the Bowery Presents”

Moderator: Keith Negus


Speakers
KA

Kemi Adeyemi

Kemi Adeyemi is currently pursuing her PhD in Northwestern University’s Performance Studies department. Her dissertation centers on the visual and performative production of black hipsters in narratives of gentrification, asking how black hipster bodies have been used to stage debates about race, culture and belonging in the city.   Abstract: | | "Hipster Soul: Sonic Blackness and the Gentrifying City" Scholars such as Fred Moten... Read More →
FH

Fabian Holt

Fabian Holt, Ph.D., Associate Professor, University of Roskilde. Holt specializes in the consumption and production of live music and cultural events in the digital age. His publications include Genre in Popular Music (Chicago 2007), Musical Performance and the Changing City (forthcoming), and articles in various international journals.   Abstract: | | "How Live Music Clubs in New York City Have Adapted to Gentrification: The Case of... Read More →
MM

Molly McGlone

Molly McGlone’s research includes the intersection of experimental and popular music as well as the spatial geography of urban music. An Assistant Dean for Advising and lecturer in music at the University of Pennsylvania, Molly is currently documenting music in West Philadelphia micro-cultures by working with a local high school.   Abstract: | | "The Sounds of Philadelphia: Examining the Creative Economy in a Post-industrial... Read More →
KN

Keith Negus

Keith Negus, Professor of Musicology, Goldsmiths, University of London entered higher education as a mature student, having spent many years playing keyboards and guitar in a variety of bands. He completed a PhD study of the music industry and subsequently taught at the Universities of Leicester and Puerto Rico before moving to Goldsmiths. His books include Producing Pop (1992), Music Genres and Corporate Cultures (1999), and Bob Dylan... Read More →


Saturday March 24, 2012 2:15pm - 3:45pm
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

2:15pm

Losing It in the City

Carolina Gonzalez, “DomiNegro Turf: Whose Uptown?”

Keith M. Harris, “‘I don’t care anymore’: Deep Soul, Doris Duke, and the Allegory of Migration”

Michael B. Gillespie, “We Almost Lost Detroit: Sonic Historiography, 9/11, and Theo Parrish”

Moderator: Ken Wissoker


Speakers
MB

Michael B. Gillespie

Michael B. Gillespie is an Assistant Professor of Film in the School of Interdisciplinary Arts, School of Film, and Department of African American Studies at Ohio University. His research focuses on film theory, black visual and expressive culture, and visual historiography. He is currently completing a book on the idea of black film. He is also co-editing a collection devoted to the Black Cinema Aesthetics conference and a collection of... Read More →
CG

Carolina Gonzales

Carolina González is a lecturer at the Latino and Hispanic Caribbean Studies Department at Rutgers University whose current academic projects focus on Caribbean transnational countercultures. As a journalist, she has covered Latin and world music for over 20 years in alternative and mainstream newspapers and magazines.   Abstract: | | "DomiNegro turf: Whose Uptown?" When “global tech” singer Maluca Mala sets her... Read More →
KH

Keith Harris

Keith M. Harris is a Visiting Associate Professor at Vassar College in the Department of Theatre and Film (2011-2012) and Associate Professor at the University of California at Riverside in the Departments of Media and Cultural Studies and English. His publications include Boys, Boyz, Bois: An Ethics of Masculinity in Popular Film, Television and Video (Routledge, 2006).   Abstract: | | "'I don't care anymore': Deep Soul, Doris Duke... Read More →
KW

Ken Wissoker

Ken Wissoker is the Editorial Director at Duke University Press and acquires books in cultural studies, pop music, anthropology, American studies, film and television, race, gender and sexuality, and other areas. He is a big music fan, over-accomplished record accumulator, and from 1984-88, as a DJ on the University of Chicago radio station, hosted the first rap music show in Chicago.


Saturday March 24, 2012 2:15pm - 3:45pm
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

2:15pm

Indie Rock and the Translocal

Christine Bacareza Balance, “Pinoise Rock”

Wendy Hsu, “Transforming Diaspora: The Kominas’s Translocal
Socio-musical Geography”

Shin Hyunjoon, “Translocal and Collaborative Creativity Between
Japan (Tokyo) and Korea (Seoul): Three Cases of Japanese Rock
Musicians in Seoul”

Moderator: Barry Shank


Speakers
CB

Christine Bacareza Balance

Christine Bacareza Balance is Assistant Professor in Asian American Studies at UC Irvine. Her writing has appeared in Women & Performance, the Journal of Asian American Studies (JAAS), and the Journal of Popular Music Studies (JPMS). A member of the band The Jack Lords Orchestra, she is currently writing a book on popular music and performance in post-World War II Filipino America.   Abstract: | | "Pinoise Rock" In 1998, the first... Read More →
WH

Wendy Hsu

Wendy Hsu received her PhD in Critical and Comparative Studies in the Music Department at the University of Virginia. She is now a Mellon Postdoctoral Digital Scholarship Fellow at the Center of Digital Learning & Research at Occidental College. She is the singer/keyboardist of Dzian!, a vintage pan-Asian garage rock band.   Abstract: | | "Transforming Diaspora: The Kominas's Translocal Socio-musical Geography" The Kominas is a... Read More →
SH

Shin Hyunjoon

Shin Hyunjoon is assistant professor in the Institute for East Asian Studies (IEAS) at Sunkonghoe University. He received his PhD from Seoul National University with a thesis on Korean music industry. Shin’s writing on K-Pop and Korean rok music has appeared in the journals: positions, Journal of Communication, and Inter-Asia Cultural Studies.   Abstract: | | "Translocal and Collaborative Creativity Between Japan (Tokyo) and Korea... Read More →
BS

Barry Shank

Barry Shank teaches in the department of Comparative Studies at Ohio State University. He is author of Dissonant Identities: The Rock ‘n’ Roll Scene in Austin, Texas and A Token of My Affection: Greeting Cards and American Business Culture. Currently serving as President of the U.S. branch of the International Association for the Study of Popular music, he is completing a book for Duke University Press entitled “Silence... Read More →


Saturday March 24, 2012 2:15pm - 3:45pm
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

2:15pm

Black Girls Rock, Thrash, and Grind!

Mashadi Matabane, “‘All the Women Are White, All the Blacks Are Men, But Some of Us Are Brave’: The Cultural Politics of Black Women Musicians with an ‘Axe’ to Grind”

Laina Dawes, “‘Black Metal is not for n@#$s, stupid b@#h!’: Black Female Metal Fans’ Inter/External Culture Clash”

Birgitta J. Johnson, “Women of the L.A. ‘Undergrind’: Female Artists Creating Alternatives to Mainstream Hip-hop’s Plastic Ceiling”

Moderator: Meagan Sylvester


Speakers
LD

Laina Dawes

Laina Dawes is the author of What Are You Doing Here? Black Women in Metal, Hardcore and Punk (Bazillion Points Books, May 2012). A music journalist, critic, and concert photographer, she writes for metal publications Exclaim! and Hellbound.ca, and is a contributing editor in the Race & Ethnicity section for Blogher.com. She resides in Toronto, Canada.   Abstract: | | "'Black Metal is not for n@#$s, stupid b@#h!': Black Female Metal... Read More →
BJ

Birgitta J. Johnson

Birgitta J. Johnson, Ph.D. is an ethnomusicology postdoctoral fellow in the Art & Music Histories Department at Syracuse University in New York. She specializes in African American and African music and her research interests include musical change and identity in black popular music and music and worship in African American churches.   Abstract: | | "Women of the L.A. 'Undergrind': Female Artists Creating Alternatives to Mainstream... Read More →
MM

Mashadi Matabane

Mashadi Matabane received a BA in Women’s Studies from Spelman College and an MA in Magazine Journalism from NYU. She is a 5th-year doctoral fellow in American Studies at Emory University. Her dissertation is a cultural history about black American women who play the electric guitar in U.S. popular music.   Abstract: | | "'All the Women Are White, All the Blacks Are Men, But Some of Us Are Brave': The Cultural Politics of Black... Read More →
MS

Meagan Sylvester

Meagan Sylvester is a Ph.D. candidate in Sociology at the University of the West Indies, St. Augustine. Her research addresses music and identity in Trinidad and Tobago, and her work on carnival musics and globalization has appeared in journals such as Caribbean Transit and In Focus, and in book volumes such as Anansi’s Defiant Webs…Languages, Literatures and Cultures of the Greater Caribbean.


Saturday March 24, 2012 2:15pm - 3:45pm
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

2:15pm

Warhol’s New York

Gustavus Stadler, “Aural Drag: Warhol as Pop Listener”

Eric Lott, “Andy’s Mick: Warhol Builds a Better Jagger”

Bryan Waterman, “It’s Too ‘Too Too’ to Put a Finger On”: Tom
Verlaine’s Lost Lisp and the Secret History of the New York Underground”

Moderator and Respondent: Jonathan Flatley


Speakers
JF

Jonathan Flatley

Jonathan Flatley teaches English at Wayne State University. He is author of Affective Mapping: Melancholia and the Politics of Modernism (Harvard, 2008), co-editor of Pop Out: Queer Warhol, and is completing Like: Andy Warhol and Affectivity. He currently edits the journal Criticism.   Abstract: | | "Lost and Found Sounds in Warhol's New York" Warhol’s love of sound recording is well known: the artist made over 4,000 tapes of... Read More →
EL

Eric Lott

Eric Lott teaches English at the University of Virginia. His books include Love and Theft: Blackface Minstrelsy and the American Working Class (Oxford, 1993) and The Disappearing Liberal Intellectual (Basic Books, 2006). He is currently at work on a project titled Tangled Up in Blue: The Cultural Contradictions of American Racism.   "Andy's Mick: Warhol Builds a Better Jagger" A funny thing happened after Exile on Main St. in the early... Read More →
GS

Gustavus Stadler

Gustavus Stadler teaches English at Haverford College and is author of Troubling Minds: The Cultural Politics of Genius in the US, 1840-1890 (Minnesota, 2006). He edited a special issue of Social Text on "The Politics of Recorded Sound" and is Co-Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Popular Music Studies.   Abstract: | | "Aural Drag: Warhol as Pop Listener" This paper is from a larger project on Warhol and anachronism which examines his... Read More →
BW

Bryan Waterman

Bryan Waterman teaches English at New York University. His books include (with Cyrus Patell) The Cambridge Companion to the Literature of New York (2010) and Television’s Marquee Moon (Continuum, 33 1/3, 2011). He is at work on another book about CBGB’s early years.   Abstract: | | "'It's Too 'Too Too' to Put a Finger On': Tom Verlaine's Lost Lisp and the Secret History of the New York Underground" Prior to releasing any of... Read More →


Saturday March 24, 2012 2:15pm - 3:45pm
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

4:00pm

Imaginary Cities

Jody Rosen, “‘Darktown Strutters’ Ball’: Shelton Brooks’ Chocolate City”

Greil Marcus, “‘Maybe Someday Your Name Will Be in Lights’: Robert Johnson Takes the City”

Ann Powers, “‘Free Your Head’: Psychedelic Rock’s Erotic Cities”

Rob Sheffield, “Gold Scenes Inside The Weirdmine: The Doors and LA”

Moderator: Eric Weisbard


Speakers
GM

Greil Marcus

Greil Marcus is the author of, most recently, The Doors: A Lifetime of Listening to Five Mean Years and Bob Dylan by Greil Marcus: Writings 1968-2010. With Werner Sollors he is the editor of A New Literary History of America, published by Harvard in 2009.   Abstract: | | "'Maybe Someday Your Name Will Be in Lights': Robert Johnson Takes the City" The great producer John Hammond referred to Robert Johnson as a primitive blues singer... Read More →
AP

Ann Powers

Ann Powers is a critic for NPR Music and author of the books Tori Amos: Piece by Piece (with the artist) and Weird Like Us: My Bohemian America.   Abstract: | | "'Free Your Head': Psychedelic Rock's Erotic Cities" Between 1967 and 1969, the youth of America created a floating polis that reshaped the rules of conventional society. Much has been written about the counterculture’s politics, its fashions, its music and its mores... Read More →
JR

Jody Rosen

Jody Rosen is the music critic for Slate, the author of White Christmas: The Story of an American Song, and the compiler of Jewface, an anthology of early 20th century Jewish novelty recordings.   Abstract: | | "'Darktown Strutters' Ball': Shelton Brooks' Chocolate City" When the songwriter Shelton Brooks published “Darktown Strutters’ Ball” in 1917, it was an instant hit—a dancehall rave-up for a transitional... Read More →
RS

Rob Sheffield

Rob Sheffield is a columnist for Rolling Stone magazine. He is the author of two books, Love Is A Mix Tape and Talking To Girls About Duran Duran.   Abstract: | | "Gold Scenes Inside The Weirdmine: The Doors and LA" The Doors are one of the most popular, famous, acclaimed, and lucrative rock & roll bands of all time. They achieved this despite some daunting limitations: the lead instrument was an organ they apparently rescued from... Read More →


Saturday March 24, 2012 4:00pm - 6:00pm
Rosenthal Pavilion, 10th Floor 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY

4:00pm

Countrified

David Cantwell, “Tired of this Dirty Old City: Country Music’s Freedom Problem, and Ours…”

Jasen Emmons, “Dim Lights, Thick Smoke, and Loud, Loud Music: How the Bakersfield Sound Saved Country Music from Itself”

Sara Marcus, “Country Music and Urbanism”

Moderator: Lauren Onkey


Speakers
DC

David Cantwell

David Cantwell is a writer and college English professor from Kansas City, where he teaches "Literature of American Popular Music." He is co-author of Heartaches by the Number: Country Music's 500 Greatest Singles and his critical biography of Merle Haggard will be published in 2013.   "Tired of this Dirty Old City: Country Music's Freedom Problem, and Ours…" Country music’s most frequently, fiercely expressed value since at... Read More →
JE

Jasen Emmons

Jasen Emmons is the director of curatorial affairs at EMP Museum in Seattle. He has curated several exhibits, including Bob Dylan’s American Journey, 1956-1966 and Taking Aim: Unforgettable Rock ‘n’ Roll Photographs.   Abstract: | | "Dim Lights, Thick Smoke, and Loud, Loud Music: How the Bakersfield Sound Saved Country Music from Itself " In the late 1950s, country music went uptown. After years of fan unity... Read More →
SM

Sara Marcus

Sara Marcus is the author of Girls to the Front: The True Story of the Riot Grrrl Revolution (Harper Perennial, 2010). Her writing appears in publications including The Nation (forthcoming, December 2011), Bookforum, Artforum, Los Angeles Review of Books, Slate, and Salon. She is a founding editor of New Herring Press.   Abstract: | | "'Living in a Big Old City': Can Country Music's Urban/Rural Moral Binary Survive?" “Someday... Read More →
LO

Lauren Onkey

Lauren Onkey is Vice President of Education and Public Programs at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum in Cleveland. She teaches at Case Western Reserve University and Cleveland State University and was formerly an English professor at Ball State University. Her publications include Blackness and Transatlantic Irish Identity: Celtic Soul Brothers (Routledge, 2009).   Abstract: | | "Feminist Musicking and Educational Activism in... Read More →


Saturday March 24, 2012 4:00pm - 6:00pm
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

4:00pm

Roundtable: And Now a Word From Our Sponsors: New Non-Profit Models for Arts Journalism

On October 10, the Knight Foundation and the NEA announced the winners of the first Community Arts Journalism Challenge, projects based in Charlotte, Detroit, Miami, Philadelphia, and San Jose. That same day, the USC Annenberg/Getty Arts Journalism Program announced its 2011 Fellows and Engine29.org “Pop-up” Lab in Los Angeles. Both initiatives are evidence of new institutional recognition that arts journalism contributes to community building. This roundtable will ask what the individual projects awarded can tell us about future roles for arts journalists and critics as engaged participants in music scenes nationwide.
With: Douglas McLennan, Tatiana Hernandez, and Bill O’Brien
Moderator: Lara Pellegrinelli 


Speakers
TH

Tatiana Hernandez

Knight Foundation
DM

Douglas McLennan

Douglas McLennan is the founder and editor of ArtsJournal.com, the leading aggregator of arts journalism on the internet. He has written for Salon, Newsweek, The New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, Wall Street Journal, the London Evening Standard and National Public Radio\'s All Things Considered. He is executive director of the new Center for Arts, Media & Audience at USC’s Annenberg School for Communications and Journalism, and a... Read More →
BO

Bill O'Brien

Bill O'Brien, Senior Advisor for Program Innovation at the National Endowment for the Arts, is responsible for exploring, examining and identifying innovative and/or emerging practices, programs and endeavors in the arts that are transformative and deserving of support. Mr. O’Brien also served as the Agency’s lead on the Knight/NEA Community Arts Journalism Challenge Before coming the NEA, he worked for seven years as... Read More →


Saturday March 24, 2012 4:00pm - 6:00pm
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

4:00pm

Roundtable: Feminist and Queer Studies of Race in Sound

This roundtable convenes two fields of scholarly inquiry—critical race studies and feminist theory/queer studies—to explore the following interrelated questions: How does sound construct racialized and gendered meaning and/or prompt processes of racial subjection? How might various hermeneutics of sound enrich and/or expand current ethnic and gender studies approaches to the study of racial formation? And how might we collectively forge a feminist, queer analytic for the study of racialized sound and sonic processes of racialization?

With: Kirstie Dorr, Roshanak Kheshti, and Deborah Vargas

Moderator: Kevin Fellezs


Speakers
KD

Kirstie Dorr

Kirstie Dorr received her Ph.D. in Comparative Ethnic Studies from the University of California, Berkeley in 2006. Prior to her appointment at UCSD in 2009, Dr. Dorr held a postdoctoral fellowship in African American Studies at the University of Illinois and a subsequent tenure-track appointment in the departments of African American, Latina/Latino and Gender and Women’s Studies.   Abstract: | | "Feminist and Queer Studies of Race... Read More →
KF

Kevin Fellezs

Kevin Fellezs is assistant professor of Music with an appointment in the Institute for Research in African-American Studies at Columbia University. He earned his PhD in History of Consciousness from UC Santa Cruz in 2004. He is the author of Birds of Fire: Jazz, Rock, Funk and the Creation of Fusion Music (Duke, 2011) and of several articles on black-Asian musical exchanges.   Abstract: | | "Another Song: Contemplating Karen Carpenter's... Read More →
avatar for Roshanak Kheshti

Roshanak Kheshti

Associate Professor of Ethnic Studies and Affiliate Faculty in Critical Gender Studies, University of California, San Diego
Roshanak Kheshti is Associate Professor of Ethnic Studies and affiliate faculty in the Critical Gender Studies Program at the University of California, San Diego. She received her PhD in Anthropology with a designated emphasis in Women’s Studies from the University of California, Santa Cruz. Her first book Modernity’s Ear: Listening to Race and Gender in World Music (NYU Press, 2015) is an examination of the form of listening promoted... Read More →
DV

Deborah Vargas

Deborah Vargas is Associate Professor in the Department of Chicano/Latino Studies at the University of California, Irvine. Her first book Dissonant Divas in Chicana Music: The Limits of La Onda is forthcoming from the University of Minnesota Press. Vargas has contributed oral histories of several singers she has researched for the Smithsonian Institution Latino Music Oral History Project.   Abstract: | | "Feminist and Queer Studies of... Read More →


Saturday March 24, 2012 4:00pm - 6:00pm
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

4:00pm

Women’s Networks

Lindsay Bernhagen, “‘Everyone Here is a Little Weird!’: Gender and Musical Intersubjectivity at the Girlz Rhythm ‘n’ Rock Camp

Maren Hancock, “Last Night a Shejay Saved My Life? Or, Do We Still Need Women Only Spaces to Nurture Female DJs?”

Marquita R. Smith, “Women of the City Underground: On Jean Grae’s ‘Tactical’ Use of Mixtape Culture”

Daniel Party, “Chile’s Revolution: Girl Style Now!”

Moderator: Kathryn Metz


Speakers
LB

Lindsay Bernhagen

Lindsay Bernhagen is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Comparative Studies at The Ohio State University. Her dissertation, which gestures toward an expanded theory of musical subjectivity, explores the popularity of gendered musical contexts in terms of the shared musical experiences that are had therein.   Abstract: | | "'Everyone here is a little weird!': Gender and Musical Intersubjectivity at the Girlz Rhythm 'n' Rock... Read More →
MH

Maren Hancock

Maren Hancock is a PhD student in Women’s Studies at York University in Toronto. The author of Lady Lazarus: Confronting Lydia Lunch, she is presently researching women and gender in DJ and electronic music cultures. Maren is also a professional DJ and a critically acclaimed MC, singer and performer.   Abstract: | | "Last Night a Shejay Saved My Life? Or, Do We Still Need Women Only Spaces to Nurture Female DJs?" There is to date... Read More →
KM

Kathryn Metz

Kathryn Metz is the Education Instructor at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum. She received her Ph.D. in Ethnomusicology from the University of Texas at Austin where her dissertation was on popular music in the urban Amazon of Peru.
DP

Daniel Party

Daniel Party is a popular music scholar who specializes on music under dictatorship, U.S. Latino music and migration, and gender studies. He is associate professor of music at Saint Mary’s College (Notre Dame, IN).   Abstract: | | "Chile's Revolution: Girl Style Now!" In 2011, Chilean indie pop music garnered international acclaim. In the United States, NPR proclaimed, “Chile keeps making the best pop in Latin... Read More →


Saturday March 24, 2012 4:00pm - 6:00pm
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

4:00pm

Roundtable: “For Promotional Use Only”: Mixtapes and the Making and Unmaking of Musical Consensus

The 2007 arrest of DJ Drama for copyright infringement signaled to that the era of rap mixtapes as both in the street and online had unalterably changed. We propose to examine what has been lost—or gained—from the disappearance of physical mixtape culture, both from its attendant spaces in the city and from the popular conversation. Where does
“authority” now lie in “making” and “breaking” such artists and how has this changed how they themselves make music and how it’s consumed?

With: Zach Baron, Tom Breihan, Ryan Dombal, Sean Fennessey,
Nick Sylvester, and Jamin Warren

Moderator: Sean Fennessey


Speakers
ZB

Zach Baron

Zach Baron is an arts critic for the Daily and the former web editor of The Village Voice. He's written about music for Slate, Pitchfork, SPIN, and elsewhere.   Abstract: | | ""For Promotional Use Only" Mixtapes and the Making and Unmaking of Musical Consensus" The 2007 arrest of DJ Drama and affiliate Don Cannon for copyright infringement was, for the hip hop world, a watershed moment. The seizure of 81,000 discs, recording gear, and... Read More →
TB

Tom Breihan

Tom Breihan is Stereogum's Senior Writer. He was once an associate editor at The Village Voice, where he spent three years writing the “Status Ain't Hood” blog and inciting its toxic comments section. He also put in a few years as a staff writer at Pitchfork. He represents Baltimore. Abstract: | | ""For Promotional Use Only" Mixtapes and the Making and Unmaking of Musical Consensus" The 2007 arrest of DJ Drama and affiliate Don... Read More →
SF

Sean Fennessey

Sean Fennessey is the editor of GQ.com and has written about music for The Village Voice, SPIN, Rolling Stone, Pitchfork, The Washington Post, and others. Abstract: | | ""For Promotional Use Only" Mixtapes and the Making and Unmaking of Musical Consensus" The 2007 arrest of DJ Drama and affiliate Don Cannon for copyright infringement was, for the hip hop world, a watershed moment. The seizure of 81,000 discs, recording gear, and various... Read More →
NS

Nick Sylvester

Nick Sylvester is the co-editor of Perineum and drummer for the rock band Mr. Dream. A former writer for The Colbert Report, he has written about music for The Wire, Pitchfork, The Village Voice, The Fader, and n+1.   Abstract: | | ""For Promotional Use Only" Mixtapes and the Making and Unmaking of Musical Consensus" The 2007 arrest of DJ Drama and affiliate Don Cannon for copyright infringement was, for the hip hop world, a watershed... Read More →
JW

Jamin Warren

Jamin Warren is a speaker, writer, and founder of Kill Screen, a videogame arts and culture company. A former reporter for the Wall Street Journal and critic for Pitchfork, he has been featured for his views on arts and technology on NPR, the New Yorker, Fast Company, and Slate.   Abstract: | | ""For Promotional Use Only" Mixtapes and the Making and Unmaking of Musical Consensus" The 2007 arrest of DJ Drama and affiliate Don Cannon for... Read More →


Saturday March 24, 2012 4:00pm - 6:00pm
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

4:00pm

Jazz Alleys

David R. Adler, “Ghost Train: Pre-Swing Big Bands and Urban Experience”

Nate Chinen, “Nice Work: Jazz Agency and the New York City Cabaret Card, 1943-1967”

Phil Freeman, “From the Corner to Carnegie Hall and Beyond: The Urbanization of Miles Davis, 1972-1991”

Alex W. Rodriguez, “Deconstructing the Hang: Urban Spaces As Cross-Cultural Contexts for Jazz Improvisation”

Moderator: Paul Bresnick


Speakers
DR

David R. Adler

David R. Adler is an adjunct lecturer in jazz history at the Aaron Copland School of Music, Queens College. He is a regular contributor to JazzTimes, Stereophile and other publications. As a (former) professional guitarist, David has worked in jazz, pop/rock, cabaret, gospel, musical theater and other settings.   Abstract: | | "Ghost Train: Pre-Swing Big Bands and Urban Experience" Pre-swing big bands of the late 1920s fulfilled unique... Read More →
PB

Paul Bresnick

Paul Bresnick established the Paul Bresnick Literary Agency, LLC in 2004. Prior to his tenure as Publisher at LiveREADS, the enhanced e-book publisher, from 2000-2002, he was Fiction Editor at Penthouse, Associate Editor at Simon & Schuster, Editor at Henry Holt, Senior Editor at Doubleday, and Executive Editor at William Morrow. He was Series Editor for Da Capo’s Best Music Writing from 2002-2005.
NC

Nate Chinen

Nate Chinen writes about music for the New York Times and JazzTimes. For each of the last six years, he has received the Helen Dance-Robert Palmer Award for Excellence in Newspaper, Magazine or Online Feature or Review Writing.   Abstract: | | "Nice Work: Jazz Agency and the New York City Cabaret Card, 1943-1967" When you live in New York City | You know that times are usually hard | When you live in New York City | You know that... Read More →
PF

Phil Freeman

Phil Freeman is a freelance journalist whose work has appeared in the Village Voice, Jazziz, The Wire and many other newspapers and magazines. He is the author of Running The Voodoo Down: The Electric Music Of Miles Davis (Backbeat, 2005) and the editor of Burning Ambulance magazine and BurningAmbulance.com.   Abstract: | | "From the Corner to Carnegie Hall and Beyond: The Urbanization of Miles Davis, 1972-1991" From the time he left St... Read More →
AW

Alex W. Rodriguez

Alex W. Rodriguez is a writer, trombonist and PhD student in ethnomusicology at UCLA. After performing with jazz and popular music groups across North and South America, he recently received an M.A. degree in Jazz History and Research from Rutgers. His current research focuses on the “hot clubs” of Chile and Argentina.   Abstract: | | "Deconstructing the Hang: Urban Spaces As Cross-Cultural Contexts for Jazz Improvisation" In... Read More →


Saturday March 24, 2012 4:00pm - 6:00pm
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

6:15pm

IAPSM-US General Membership Meeting

The general membership meeting of IASPM-US is the organization’s opportunity to gather together and discuss the accomplishments of the past year, any concerns or issues that have arisen, and plans for the coming year. All IASPM members are welcome. We would also like to invite any interested regular EMP Pop Conference participants who might be interested in joining IASPM. Beyond our normal business, the general meeting this year will feature the announcement of the first winner of the Charles Hamm Memorial Award in recognition of lifetime contribution to Popular Music Studies. In addition, the David Sanjek Award for best paper by a graduate student at the meeting will be announced.


Saturday March 24, 2012 6:15pm - 7:30pm
Rosenthal Pavilion, 10th Floor 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY

6:30pm

AFTER HOURS: Conference Party

Conference attendees 21 and older are invited to continue the conversation into the night at Von, , located at 3 Bleecker Street between Lafayette and Bowery. Panelists will receive a wristband to enjoy cocktails at the bar. Sponsored by NPR Music

http://www.vonbar.com

212-880-3430


Saturday March 24, 2012 6:30pm - 9:30pm
Von 3 Bleecker Street, Floor 19 New York, NY 10036

11:00pm

AFTER HOURS: Bollywood Disco—Tropical Bass Edition Retro film classics, Eclectic Disco and Tropical Bass Grooves

DJ Rekha, Eddie Stats and guests, Visuals by Fictive

Since 2002, DJ Rekha and her crew have translated the exuberance and energy of the Bollywood screen to the New York dance floor. This special edition of Bollywood Disco has a Tropical Bass spin to coincide with the Roundtable her and her musical co-conspirator, Eddie Stats, have cooked up for the EMP Pop Conference. By digging deep into their digital and physical crates Rekha, Eddie, and special guests paint the sonic boom of an Indian Film Soundtrack collide with island vibes.

Admission: $10 for EMP/IASPM-US participants w/ unique badge, $12 advance, $15 at door


Speakers
RM

Rekha Malhotra AKA DJ Rekha

Rekha Malhotra AKA DJ Rekha is a DJ, producer and founder of Basement Bhangra™ and Bollywood Disco club nights. She has designed sound for "Bridge and Tunnel" on Broadway and NPR, and curated shows for Summerstage, Celebrate Brooklyn and 92Y Tribeca. She is an adjunct lecturer at NYU’s Clive Davis Institute of Recorded Music where she teaches about contemporary South Asian music and DJ culture.   Abstract: | | "Tropical Music... Read More →



Saturday March 24, 2012 11:00pm - Sunday March 25, 2012 4:00am
(Le) Poisson Rouge 158 Bleecker Street, New York, NY 10012
 
Sunday, March 25
 

8:00am

Book Display
Sunday March 25, 2012 8:00am - 5:00pm
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

8:00am

Registration

Sunday March 25, 2012 8:00am - 5:00pm
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

9:00am

Distanced Listening

Jeremy Morris, “Hear, Here: Location-Based Music”

Van Truong, “Distant Sounds”

Mark Katz, “Analog and Digital: A Love Story”

Karl Hagstrom Miller, “I am Sitting in a Room: The Private Pop Experience”

Moderator: Tom Miller


Speakers
KH

Karl Hagstrom Miller

Karl Hagstrom Miller is Associate Professor of History at the University of Texas at Austin. He is the author of Segregating Sound: Inventing Folk and Pop Music in the Age of Jim Crow (Duke). He is currently writing a book about the history of amateur participation in commercial pop music. |   | Abstract: | | "I am Sitting in a Room: The Private Pop Experience" | Alone in a room with music--reverberations fill the space. The outside... Read More →
TM

Tom Miller

Tom Miller is an anthropologist of music, curator, and sound and media artist. His research, writings, and installations bridge the disciplines of ethnomusicology, popular culture, museology, audiovisual representation, sensory mediation, shamanism, and the history of science. He holds degrees from Wesleyan University (B.A. in Music) and Columbia University (M.A., M.Phil., Ph.D. in Anthropology). He is Professor of Liberal Arts at... Read More →
JM

Jeremy Morris

Jeremy Morris is an Assistant Professor in Media and Cultural Studies in the Department of Communication Arts at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His research interests include the digitization of cultural goods and commodities, the transition from software to “apps”, and the current state of the popular music industries. Jeremy was also a regular contributor and podcaster at Midnight Poutine, a local Montreal website devoted to music... Read More →
VT

Van Truong

Van Truong is a Ph.D. candidate in the American Studies program at Yale University. Her work explores everyday, lived conditions of contemporary migration through literary, visual, and aural expressions of diasporic trauma and memory. She is also co-founder of SOUND HALL. www.soundhall.org   Abstract: | | "Distant Sounds" "An exile feels that the state of exile is a constant, special sensitivity to sound. So I sometimes feel that... Read More →


Sunday March 25, 2012 9:00am - 11:00am
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

9:00am

Roundtable: Toward a Culture-Emergent Hip-Hop Studies

This roundtable features accomplished scholar-practitioners of hip-hop, some of whom approach this work as hip hop artists turned academics; some as academics who became artists in the process of researching hip hop; and some who experience hip-hop as part of the ongoing negotiation of their everyday lives. Discussants are asked to reflect on the virtues and potential pitfalls involved in this cultural collision of research, performance, advocacy and personal expression. In what ways do these experiences reflect the condition of urbanity itself, which gave rise to hip-hop in the first place?

With: Sujatha Fernandes, Ali Colleen Neff, Joe Schloss, and Oliver Wang

Moderator: Anthony Kwame Harrison


Speakers
SF

Sujatha Fernandes

Sujatha Fernandes is associate professor of Sociology at Queens College and the Graduate Center, CUNY. She is the author of Cuba Represent! (Duke University Press, 2006) and Who Can Stop the Drums? (Duke University Press, 2010). Her most recent book is Close to the Edge: In Search of the Global Hip Hop Generation (Verso, 2011). She has lived, performed and done field research on hip hop in Sydney, Havana, Chicago, and... Read More →
AK

Anthony Kwame Harrison

Anthony Kwame Harrison is associate professor of Sociology and Africana Studies at Virginia Tech. Kwame is author of Hip Hop Underground (Temple University Press, 2009) and associate editor of the Journal of Popular Music Studies. He has released several CDs, twelve-inch singles, and underground tapes as a member of the Bay Area’s Forest Fires Collectives.   Abstract: | | "The The ? Remains: Toward a Culture-Emergent Hip-Hop... Read More →
AC

Ali Colleen Neff

Ali Colleen Neff is a writer, filmmaker, and turntablist with the Bay Area\'s Red Wine Society. As a Ph.D. student in Cultural Studies at UNC – Chapel Hill, she has worked extensively with the musical communities of Mississippi and Senegal. Her book, Let the World Listen Right: The Mississippi Delta Hip-Hop Story (University Press of Mississippi, 2009) and her website, www.ethnolyrical.org, document musical life throughout the Black... Read More →
JS

Joe Schloss

Joe Schloss is the author of Foundation: B-boys, B-girls and Hip-hop Culture in New York (Oxford University Press, 2009), and Making Beats: The Art of Sample-Based Hip-Hop (Wesleyan University Press, 2004). He is adjunct assistant professor of Black and Latino Studies at Baruch College of the City University of New York.   Abstract: | | "The The ? Remains: Toward a Culture-Emergent Hip-Hop Studies" Of all forms of popular music... Read More →
OW

Oliver Wang

Oliver Wang is assistant professor of Sociology at California State University-Long Beach. He contributes regularly to NPR and the LA Times and runs the audio-blog, Soul-Sides.com.   Abstract: | | "The The ? Remains: Toward a Culture-Emergent Hip-Hop Studies" Of all forms of popular music, hip-hop is arguably the most explicit in its claims to constituting a distinctive and coherent “culture”. Yet – paradoxically... Read More →


Sunday March 25, 2012 9:00am - 11:00am
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

9:00am

Experimental

Andy Battaglia, the Columbia-Princeton Electronic Music Center

John Cline, “The Other Side of the Garage: The Los Angeles Free Music Society and Suburbia”

Charles Kronengold, “Sensing Thinking, Puzzling Interfacing in NYC Experimentalisms, 1979-84”

Ben Neill, “Beyond Downtown—The Impact of Lower Manhattan’s Music Scenes on Contemporary Musical Culture”

Moderator: Kembrew McLeod


Speakers
AB

Andy Battaglia

Andy Battaglia is a writer in New York, where he contributes to the Wall Street Journal, The Wire, The National, Slate, The Daily Beast, eMusic, Resident Advisor, Bookforum, and several other publications. He also helps organize Unsound Festival New York, a festival of adventurous music made up of concerts and attendant talks, presentations, and so forth. More information can be found at www.andybattaglia.com.   Abstract: | | "Circuits in... Read More →
JC

John Cline

John Cline is completing his Ph.D. in American Studies at the University of Texas; his dissertation covers the development of experimental music collectives in the 1970s and 1980s, parallel to but separate from both punk and more traditional avant-garde institutions like the Kitchen in NYC. His work has appeared in The Oxford American and the Grove Dictionary of American Music, among others.   Abstract: | | "The Other Side of the... Read More →
CK

Charles Kronengold

Charles Kronengold has published on popular music, Western art music, film and aesthetics. This paper’s focus on “puzzling interfacing” expands on a theme in his second book, Different Methods, Different Signs: Crediting Thinking in Soul and Dance Music. He teaches musicology at Stanford.   Abstract: | | "Sensing Thinking, Puzzling Interfacing" Early-eighties experimental music in New York City looked and felt as odd... Read More →
KM

Kembrew McLeod

Kembrew McLeod is a writer, filmmaker, and Associate Professor of Communication Studies at the University of Iowa. He has published several books on music, copyright, and culture, and is finishing a book on media pranks for NYU Press. McLeod’s co-produced documentary Copyright Criminals aired in 2010 on PBS’s Emmy Award-winning series Independent Lens.   Abstract: | | "Killer Apps Play the Sounds of the Cities" Take an... Read More →
BN

Ben Neill

Ben Neill is a composer, performer, producer, and inventor of the mutantrumpet, a hybrid electro-acoustic instrument. Neill’s music has been recorded on Universal/Verve, Astralwerks, Six Degrees, Thirsty Ear and Ramseur, and his writings have appeared in the book Audio Culture as well as Leonardo Music Journal. Since 2008 he has been Assistant Professor of Music Industry/ Production at Ramapo College.   Abstract: | | "Beyond... Read More →


Sunday March 25, 2012 9:00am - 11:00am
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

9:00am

Black Women Musicians & the Urban Avant Garde

Daphne Brooks, “‘One of These Mornings, You’re Gonna Rise up Singing’: The Secret Black Feminist History of the Gershwins’ Porgy and Bess

Farah Jasmine Griffin, “Playing through the Changes: Mary Lou Williams’ Manhattan”

Salamishah Tillet, “Bethlehem, Boardwalks, and the City of Brotherly Love: Nina Simone’s Pre-Civil Rights Aesthetic”

Jayna Brown, “After the End of the World: Afro Diasporan Feminism
and Alternative Dimensions of Sound”

Moderator and Respondent: Imani Perry


Speakers
DA

Daphne A. Brooks

Daphne A. Brooks is professor of English and African American Studies at Princeton University. She is the author of Bodies in Dissent: Spectacular Performances of Race and Freedom (Duke UP, 2006), Jeff Buckley’s Grace (Continuum, 2005), as well as the liner notes for Take A Look: Aretha Franklin Complete on Columbia and Come On and See Me: The Complete Tammi Terrell. She is currently at work on Subterranean Blues: Black Women and Sound... Read More →
JB

Jayna Brown

Jayna Brown is associate professor of Ethnic Studies at UC Riverside. She is the author of Babylon Girls: Black Women Performers and the Shaping of the Modern (Duke University Press, 2008), as well as numerous articles on race, gender, global sound and post-coloniality. She is also the co-editor of special issues of Social Text and Women and Performance. Her current projects focus on race, technology, and utopias in speculative fiction and global... Read More →
FJ

Farah Jasmine Griffin

Farah Jasmine Griffin is professor of English and Comparative Literature and African-American Studies at Columbia University. She is the author of “Who Set You Flowin’?:” The African-American Migration Narrative (Oxford University Press, 1995); If You Can’t Be Free, Be a Mystery: In Search of Billie Holiday (The Free Press, 2001); and co-author of Clawing at the Limits of Cool: Miles Davis, John Coltrane, and the... Read More →
IP

Imani Perry

Imani Perry is professor of African American Studies at Princeton University. She is the author of Prophets of the Hood: Politics and Poetics in Hip Hop (Duke University Press, 2004), More Beautiful and More Terrible: The Embrace and Transcendence of Racial Inequality in the United States (New York University Press, 2011), as well as numerous articles. Her current projects include a cultural exploration of “Lift Every Voice and... Read More →
ST

Salamishah Tillet

Salamishah Tillet is assistant professor of English and Africana Studies at the University of Pennsylvania. She is the author of Sites of Slavery: Citizenship and Racial Democracy in the Post-Civil Rights Imagination (Duke University Press, 2012), co-editor of the forthcoming Seems the Good Die Young: Music, Mourning, and The Political Assassinations of the 1960s, and wrote liner notes for the album, Wake Up! by John Legend and The Roots. She... Read More →


Sunday March 25, 2012 9:00am - 11:00am
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

9:00am

Baby Please Don’t Go: The City as Women’s Ruin in American Roots Music

Holly Hobbs, “Little Sparrows and Tender Maidens: Thoughts on Old and New World Balladry and Cautionary Tales”

Alison Fensterstock, “Fallen Angels: The Persistent Plotline of Woman’s Ruin in Hip-Hop, Hair Metal and Beyond”

Holly George-Warren, “Dolly Does Deflowered Damsels: How Dolly Parton’s Fallen-Woman Songcraft Took Her to the Top”

Moderator: Diane Pecknold


Speakers
AF

Alison Fensterstock

Alison Fensterstock is a music writer at the New Orleans Times-Picayune and the program director for the Ponderosa Stomp Foundation. Recent projects include co-curating the “Where They At” exhibition and oral history archive on New Orleans bounce music and the Louisiana State Museum’s “Unsung Heroes” exhibit on Louisiana R&B, rock, garage and blues.   Abstract: | | "Fallen Angels: The Persistent... Read More →
HG

Holly George-Warren

Holly George-Warren is the author of a dozen books, including The Road to Woodstock (with Michael Lang) and the award-winning Public Cowboy No. 1: The Life & Times of Gene Autry. She has written for Rolling Stone, the Village Voice, and the New York Times, and she coproduced the Grammy-nominated box set RESPECT. She teaches at NYU’s Clive Davis Institute of Recorded Music and at SUNY-New Paltz and is at work on a biography of Alex... Read More →
HH

Holly Hobbs

Holly Hobbs is a PhD candidate in Ethnomusicology at Tulane University, where she is working to design and launch a digital archive of hiphop music/oral history post-Katrina. Before relocating to New Orleans, Hobbs directed the youth nonprofit New Media Network in Columbia, Missouri while developing the Missouri Rural Crisis Center Documentary Film Series.   Abstract: | | "Little Sparrows and Tender Maidens: Thoughts on Old and New... Read More →
DP

Diane Pecknold

Diane Pecknold is an Assistant Professor of Women’s and Gender Studies at the University of Louisville, where she teaches popular culture and feminist studies. She is the author of The Selling Sound: The Rise of the Country Music Industry and co-editor of A Boy Named Sue: Gender and Country Music.   Abstract: | | "The Spectral Cityscapes of Tween Pop" The city of the adult pop and rock imaginary is a place of heterogeneity... Read More →


Sunday March 25, 2012 9:00am - 11:00am
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

9:00am

The Rock Turn

Tom Smucker, “When Bobby Went Bob: Darin’s Muddled Dylan Turn, The Assassination of RFK, and the Collapse of Ring A Ding Urban Masculinity”

Jack Hamilton, “‘Summer’s Here and the Time Is Right’: The Rolling Stones and the Death of Sixties Music”

Andy Zax, “Remapping The Woodstock Festival:  How I Uncovered The True History Of ‘The Second-Largest City In New York State’ And Made Country Joe McDonald Hate My Guts”

Douglas Wolk, “Songs of The City”

Moderator: Michaelangelo Matos


Speakers
JH

Jack Hamilton

Jack Hamilton is a graduate student in the History of American Civilization program at Harvard University, where he is finishing a dissertation on racial imagination and popular music in the 1960s. His writing has appeared online and in print in The Atlantic, Transition, and elsewhere.
MM

Michaelangelo Matos

Michaelangelo Matos writes for NPR, Spin, Rolling Stone, Village Voice, The Guardian, The Daily, and eMusic. He is working on a history of American rave in the ’90s. He lives in Brooklyn.   Abstract: | | "A Trip to MARS-FM: The Story of L.A.'s Rave Radio Station, 1991-92" From late 1991 until July 1992, Southern California’s airwaves heralded the future. Utilizing a synchronized signal at 103.1 FM in Los Angeles (KDLD... Read More →
TS

Tom Smucker

Tom Smucker has been writing about pop culture and politics since the 1960s and wrote the chapter on the Carpenters and Lawrence Welk in the current EMP anthology. His novel An Inconvenient Amish Zombie Left Behind The Da Vinci Diet Code Truth was published in 2011.   Abstract: | | "When Bobby Went Bob: Darin's Muddled Dylan Turn, The Assassination of RFK, and the Collapse of Ring A Ding Urban Masculinity." Rock, Pop, Swing, Country... Read More →
DW

Douglas Wolk

Douglas Wolk is the author of Live at the Apollo (Continuum, 2003) and Reading Comics (Da Capo, 2007). He writes about pop music and comic books for Time, Rolling Stone, Pitchfork and elsewhere, and has run the tiny record label Dark Beloved Cloud since 1992. He lives in Portland, Oregon.   Abstract: | | "Songs of The City" In 1968, Carole King split up with her longtime collaborator Gerry Goffin and formed a band called The City with... Read More →
avatar for Andy Zax/@Discographies

Andy Zax/@Discographies

Andy Zax is a Grammy-nominated music producer. Under the alias @Discographies, his writing has appeared in Rolling Stone, The New Yorker, The Daily and on Twitter; the Village Voice hailed him as its music critic of the year in 2010. He lives in Los Angeles.


Sunday March 25, 2012 9:00am - 11:00am
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

11:15am

Utopian Spaces in an Accelerated Age

Wayne Marshall, “Music as Social Life in an Age of Platform Politricks”

Julianne Escobedo Shepherd, “Cunt Music: When Vogue House Dips Meet Dipset” 

Max Pearl and Alexis Stephens, “New Jack City:  Frenzied Cultures, Transitory Spaces (or, how I learned to stop worrying and embrace the hype cycle)”

Moderator: Eric Lott


Speakers
EL

Eric Lott

Eric Lott teaches English at the University of Virginia. His books include Love and Theft: Blackface Minstrelsy and the American Working Class (Oxford, 1993) and The Disappearing Liberal Intellectual (Basic Books, 2006). He is currently at work on a project titled Tangled Up in Blue: The Cultural Contradictions of American Racism.   "Andy's Mick: Warhol Builds a Better Jagger" A funny thing happened after Exile on Main St. in the early... Read More →
WM

Wayne Marshall

Wayne Marshall is an ethnomusicologist, blogger (wayneandwax.com), and DJ. While working on a book about music and digital youth culture, he's currently teaching at Brandeis University. He co-edited and contributed to Reggaeton (Duke 2009) and has written for The Wire, the Boston Phoenix, and journals such as Popular Music and Callaloo.   Abstract: | | "Music as Social Life in an Age of Platform Politricks" The advent of socially... Read More →
MP

Max Pearl

Max Pearl is managing editor of Cluster Mag, a publication focused on contemporary music, art, culture, and identity. His work has appeared in the Boston Globe, Time Out and Boston\'s Weekly Dig. Abstract: | | "New Jack City: Frenzied Cultures, Transitory Spaces (or, how I learned to stop worrying and embrace the hype cycle)" The media madness surrounding magazine cover story acts Odd Future and Kreayshawn in Spring and Summer of 2010 were... Read More →
JE

Julianne Escobedo Shepherd

Julianne Escobedo Shepherd has written about music, pop culture, and politics for Spin, Billboard, Vibe, MTV, New York Times, AlterNet, Guernica, Interview, and many more. Formerly the Executive Editor of the Fader, she now free lances from her apartment in Brooklyn.   Abstract: | | "Cunt Music: When Vogue House Dips Meet Dipset" Since Jennie Livingston’s groundbreaking 1990 documentary Paris is Burning, outsiders have viewed... Read More →
AS

Alexis Stephens

Alexis Stephens is a blogger (ongakuclub.wordpress.com), contributor to Cluster Mag, and her work has appeared in NYRemezcla.com.   Abstract: | | "New Jack City: Frenzied Cultures, Transitory Spaces (or, how I learned to stop worrying and embrace the hype cycle)" The media madness surrounding magazine cover story acts Odd Future and Kreayshawn in Spring and Summer of 2010 were thrilling in their urgency. They were big news only... Read More →


Sunday March 25, 2012 11:15am - 12:45pm
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

11:15am

Yoko, Dollybirds, and a Female Elvis

Leah Tallen Branstetter, “Little Miss Swivel Hips 1957: In Search of the “Female Elvis”

Alexandra Apolloni, “Beat Girls and Dollybirds: Envoicing Swinging London”

Elizabeth Lindau, “’Mother Superior’: Maternity as Performance Art in the Work of Yoko Ono”

Moderator: Marilisa Merolla


Speakers
AA

Alexandra Apolloni

Alexandra Apolloni is a doctoral candidate at UCLA, where she is writing a dissertation on British girl singers in the 1960s, and issues of race and femininity. She is also editor of Echo: a music-centered journal, and contributes to Blogging.LA, a group blog about Los Angeles.   Abstract: | | "Beat Girls and Dollybirds: Envoicing Swinging London" In the mid-1960s, London was said to be swinging. A burgeoning youth culture transformed... Read More →
LT

Leah Tallen Branstetter

Leah Branstetter is a PhD student at Case Western Reserve University, where she focuses her research on nineteenth- and twentieth-century American popular music, theater music, and opera. She also serves as an editorial assistant for the Journal of the American Musicological Society and volunteers at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum’s Library and Archives. Abstract: | | "Little Miss Swivel Hips 1957: In Search of the 'Female... Read More →
EL

Elizabeth Lindau

Elizabeth Lindau is a Ph.D. candidate in Critical and Comparative Studies in Music at the University of Virginia. Her dissertation, “Art is Dead. Long Live Rock!” explores rock’s revitalization of avant-gardism. She has presented at meetings of the IASPM-U.S., the Society for American Music, and the Modernist Studies Association.   Abstract: | | "'Mother Superior': Maternity as Performance Art in the Work of Yoko... Read More →
MM

Marilisa Merolla

Marilisa Merolla is Assistant Professor in Contemporary History, Mass Communication History and City and Landscape History at Department of Social Sciences of “Sapienza” University of Rome. She is the Principal Investigator of the Research Program The sounds of the city. The metamorphosis of gathering places of youth and public policies regarding safety in Rome on a comparative basis with New York, funded by MIUR (Italian Ministry of... Read More →


Sunday March 25, 2012 11:15am - 12:45pm
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

11:15am

Black Music in Three Cities

Simon Balto, “‘Every Decent Citizen’: Jazz, Sex, and Policing in Postwar Milwaukee”

Charles L. Hughes, “‘The Spirit of the Music Was Black’: The Racial Politics of “The Memphis Sound”

Jeff Kollath, “Working the Line, Working the Crowd: The Soul of Indianapolis Music and Labor”

Moderator: Alexander Shashko


Speakers
SB

Simon Balto

Simon Balto is a Ph.D. candidate in the Departments of History and Afro-American Studies at the University of Wisconsin, where he studies African American History and the African Diaspora throughout the Americas. His current research interests focus primarily on the relationships between policing, race, and migration in twentieth century urban America.   Abstract: | | "'Every Decent Citizen': Jazz, Sex, and Policing in Postwar... Read More →
JK

Jeff Kollath

Jeff Kollath is the Curator of History at the Wisconsin Veterans Museum in Madison, Wisconsin. He earned his MA in Public History from Indiana University-Purdue University-Indianapolis (IUPUI), and has written and researched extensively on the history of soul and funk music in Indianapolis during the Civil Rights Era.   Abstract: | | "Working the Line, Working the Crowd: The Soul of Indianapolis Music and Labor" A Northern city with a... Read More →
AS

Alexander Shashko

Alexander Shashko teaches cultural and political history in the Afro-American Studies Program at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He has run the online Dadooronron music discussion list since 1997.


Sunday March 25, 2012 11:15am - 12:45pm
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

11:15am

What Cities Allow

Jake Austen, “Icons of Obstinacy: The Urban Enablement of Rock ‘n’ Roll Delusionals 1980s-1990s”

Katherine Meizel, “Size Matters: ‘Mini-Popstars’ and New Dimensions of Celebrity Impersonation”

Eric Hung, “Stayin’ Alive: Senior Citizen Choirs Rocking Out in Korea, China and the U.S.”

Moderator: Carl Wilson


Speakers
JA

Jake Austen

Jake Austen is an independent music writer and the editor of Roctober magazine. He is the author of TV-a-Go-Go: Rock on TV from American Bandstand to American Idol, the editor of Flying Saucers Rock n Roll (Duke, 2011), and a founder and puppeteer of the cult-favorite cable access dance show Chic-a-Go-Go.   Abstract: | | "Icons of Obstinacy: The Urban Enablement of Rock 'n' Roll Delusionals" With its rumbling music industry mechanisms... Read More →
EH

Eric Hung

Eric Hung is Associate Professor of Music History at Rider University and Executive Director of Gamelan Dharma Swara. His academic research focuses on Asian American music, television music, and musical covers. He also writes about film for Meniscus Magazine.   Abstract: | | "Stayin' Alive: Senior Citizen Choirs Rocking Out in Korea, China and the U.S." As their populations age, “senior citizen” choirs are popping up in... Read More →
KM

Katherine Meizel

Katherine Meizel is an Assistant Professor of Ethnomusicology at Bowling Green State University. She has published in Slate.com, Popular Music & Society, and other journals and collections. Her book Idolized: Music, Media, and Identity in American Idol (Indiana University Press) was released in 2011.   Abstract: | | "Size Matters: 'Mini-Popstars' and New Dimensions of Celebrity Impersonation" Las Vegas has long been a national hub of... Read More →
CW

Carl Wilson

Carl Wilson is the author of Let’s Talk About Love: A Journey to the End of Taste (33 1/3 Series). He is an editor at The Globe and Mail, a blogger at backtotheworld.net and a curator for the Trampoline Hall Lecture Series, and has written for The New York Times, The L.A. Times, Slate, the Oxford American and many others.   Abstract: | | "We Hate It When Our Friends Become Successful: The Death and Life of Great North American... Read More →


Sunday March 25, 2012 11:15am - 12:45pm
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

11:15am

Last Days of Disco

Christian John Wikane, “Radio Casbah: Inside the Kingdom of Casablanca Records”

Morgan Woolsey, “’Trying to Feel the Movie’s Zither Vibrations’: Film Music and the Construction of Subjectivity in William Friedkin’s Cruising

Ryan Bunch, “Ease On Down the Road: Black Music and the Urban American Fairy Tale of The Wiz

Moderator: Raymond Knapp


Speakers
RK

Raymond Knapp

Raymond Knapp is Professor of Musicology at UCLA. His books include Symphonic Metamorphoses: Subjectivity and Alienation in Mahler’s Re-Cycled Songs, The American Musical and the Formation of National Identity (winner of the George Jean Nathan Award for Dramatic Criticism), The American Musical and the Performance of Personal Identity, and The Oxford Handbook of the American Musical.   Abstract: | | "The Sound of Broadway's Mean... Read More →
CJ

Christian John Wikane

Based in NYC, Christian John Wikane is a Contributing Editor for PopMatters, where he authored the five-part oral history, Casablanca Records: Play It Again. He's penned extensive essays for several dozen album re-issues. He also co-founded the UnFiltered Concert Series with Nona Hendryx and produces an annual benefit at Joe's Pub (NYC).   Abstract: | | "Radio Casbah: Inside the Kingdom of Casablanca Records" Beyond the gates of 8255... Read More →
MW

Morgan Woolsey

Morgan Woolsey is a doctoral student in the Musicology Department at UCLA. Her work focuses on the intersections between studies of identity and music in film. Her essay on music as structure will be featured in a forthcoming anthology on the films of the L.A. Rebellion.   Abstract: | | "'Trying to feel the movie's zither vibrations': Film Music and the Construction of Subjectivity in William Friedkin's Cruising" Upon its release in... Read More →


Sunday March 25, 2012 11:15am - 12:45pm
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

11:15am

Roundtable: Cover Charges & Late-Night Jams

The fruitful relationship of jazz and “The Big Apple” stands as one of the foremost examples of a musical style benefiting from, and in turn helping to define, a supportive home. The first half of this event is a multimedia survey by Ashley Kahn of representative New York City jazz venues, from the 1920s through the 2000s; the second half is a panel discussion asking what is it about New York City and jazz that accounts for their lasting relationship, with a more contemporary focus on forums of free-flowing musical exchange and financial support for the music’s creators.

With: Legendary jazz impresario George Wein; veteran Jazz at Lincoln Center producer Billy Bank; and Jazz Standard creative director Seth Abramson

Moderator: Ashley Kahn


Speakers
SA

Seth Abramson

Seth Abramson, a Grammy Award-Winning Producer, is founder of Rabbit Moon Productions, Inc. (RMP) a live music presentation and production company. He also serves as the Creative Artistic Director for the Jazz Standard, the renowned New York City jazz club owned by restaurateur Danny Meyer, and for the past nine years, has been producing events for the annual Madison Square Oval Lawn Music Series. He has held various positions at major record... Read More →
BB

Billy Banks

Billy Banks is principal owner and director of Banks Entertainment, a management consulting and production services company, and has worked for more than 30 years as a concert/tour producer, record producer tour manager, and music business management consultant. Since 1982, he has worked closely with trumpeter/band leader Wynton Marsalis on a wide variety of performance and recording projects, and established the role of Director of Production... Read More →
GW

George Wein

George Wein is the world’s leading jazz impresario, an NEA Jazz Master and is widely regarded as the godfather of music festivals, having produced the first Newport Jazz Festival in 1954, followed five years later by the Newport Folk Festival. His autobiography Myself Among Others is a must-read for anyone interested in the history of jazz, the music business or American music in general.   Abstract: | | "Slices of the Apple... Read More →


Sunday March 25, 2012 11:15am - 12:45pm
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

12:45pm

Lunch Break

FOOD AND DRINK

The Market Place at the Kimmel Center offers a variety of international and traditional dining choices including:

The Italian Market

Faye’s Deli

Habanero Mexican

Halal

Yolato Frozen Yogurt


Sunday March 25, 2012 12:45pm - 2:15pm
Break

1:00pm

Rhyme Thoughts Travel at a Tremendous Speed”: GZA/The Genius Discusses Liquid Swords

(image credit: Kai Regan/Alldayeveryday)

In 1995 GZA released Liquid Swords, the first of the solo Wu Tang Clan efforts. The album is constantly referenced among artists in the indie, electronic, and of course hip hop world as an inspiration for its eclecticism and challenge to standard ways of writing music. Pitchfork media, for example, invited GZA to perform the classic album in full at their summer festival. The GZA will discuss the album within the framework of a discussion of his career as an MC, his creative process, and the global state of an artform that began right here in New York City.

Moderator: Jon Caramanica


Speakers
JC

Jon Caramanica

Jon Caramanica is a pop critic at the New York Times.   Abstract: | | "'Rhyme Thoughts Travel At A Tremendous Speed': GZA/The Genius Discusses Liquid Swords" In 1995 GZA released LIQUID SWORDS, the first of the solo Wu Tang Clan efforts. The album is constantly referenced among artists in the indie, electronic, and of course hip hop world as an inspiration for its eclecticism and challenge to standard ways of writing music... Read More →
avatar for GZA/The Genius

GZA/The Genius

GZA/The Genius is a founding member of the seminal hip hop group the Wu-Tang Clan. His1995 solo effort, Liquid Swords, produced entirely by RZA, met with critical and commercial acclaim, and is widely considered one of the best albums to come out of the Wu-Tang camp. In 1998, the album was selected as one of The Source magazine\'s 100 Best Rap Albums of all time. GZA made an appearance with RZA in Jim Jarmusch’s film Coffee & Cigarettes... Read More →


Sunday March 25, 2012 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Rosenthal Pavilion, 10th Floor 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY

1:00pm

Phoebe Jacobs Talks About Her Career in the Music Industry: A Thematic Interview with Judith Tick

Jacobs oversaw public relations at two legendary venues in New York City, Basin Street East and the Rainbow Room and Rainbow Grill at Rockefeller Center, and can contribute to our understanding of the
music making which these spaces both enabled and constrained at a time during which jazz was fighting for its social life in the city. She also served as the publicist for such musicians as Ella Fitzgerald, Sarah Vaughan, and Peggy Lee: public relations provided opportunities for women in an otherwise male dominated music industry.

Moderator: Judith Tick


Speakers
PJ

Phoebe Jacobs

Phoebe Jacobs is Executive vice president of the Louis Armstrong Educational Foundation. Her archives are located at Columbia University and the Center for Black Music Research, Columbia College, Chicago. Her experiences and memories are documented in many jazz biographies, among them the lives of Ella Fitzgerald, Louis Armstrong, Peggy Lee, and Billy Strayhorn.   Abstract: | | "Phoebe Jacobs Talks About Her Career in the Music... Read More →
JT

Judith Tick

Judith Tick is a music historian specializing in American music and women’s history. A Distinguished University Professor at Northeastern University, she was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2004 as an “innovator in the field of musical biography.” She is writing a biography of Ella Fitzgerald.   Abstract: | | "Phoebe Jacobs Talks About Her Career in the Music Industry: A Thematic Interview with... Read More →


Sunday March 25, 2012 1:00pm - 2:00pm
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

2:15pm

Politics of Place

Adrienne Day, “Occupy Greenwich Village”

Charlie Bertsch, Tucson after Giffords and the immigration bill

Noriko Manabe, “Music and Musicians in the Post-Fukushima Era”

Moderator: Stephen Duncombe


Speakers
CB

Charlie Bertsch

Charlie Bertsch is Co-Editor-in-Chief at Souciant. He was Music Editor at Tikkun and ZEEK and has also written about culture and politics for The Oxford American, New Times, and the pioneering internet magazine Bad Subjects: Political Education for Everyday Life, which he helped to found back in 1992. He has taught at the University of California at Berkeley, the University of Arizona and Arizona State University.   Abstract... Read More →
AD

Adrienne Day

Adrienne Day is a writer, editor and proud Greenwich Village native. Day worked as an editor at Entertainment Weekly and Spin magazines, and has written for the New York Times, New York magazine, Wired, the Village Voice and City Limits, among other outlets.   Abstract: | | "Occupy Greenwich Village" As the fight over Zuccotti Park rages on, the idea of who "occupies" urban space hasn't been so hotly contested since the publication of... Read More →
SD

Stephen Duncombe

Stephen Duncombe is a professor at New York University and author and editor of six books, including Notes From Underground: Zines and the Politics of Underground Culture, Dream: Re-Imagining Progressive Politics in an Age of Fantasy and, most recently, White Riot: Punk Rock and the Politics of Race. Duncombe is a life-long political activist, and presently co-director of the Center for Artistic Activism.
NM

Noriko Manabe

Noriko Manabe is an Assistant Professor of Ethnomusicology at Princeton University. Her publications on Japanese rap, ringtones, and Cuban music have appeared in Ethnomusicology, Asian Music, and Latin American Music Review. She has forthcoming articles on Japanese DJs in Popular Music and on online radio in the Oxford Handbook of Mobile Music.   Abstract: | | "Music and Musicians in the Post-Fukushima Era" The historic earthquake and... Read More →


Sunday March 25, 2012 2:15pm - 3:45pm
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

2:15pm

“Beat Street”: New York City Hip-Hop

Patrick Rivers, “Rumble in the Concrete Jungle: Beat Battles in NYC and Their Impact on Hip-Hop Production”

Shanté Paradigm Smalls, “‘Voices Carry’: Queer Dissonance and the Travel of NYC 1980s Hip-Hop Sound”

Chris Tabron, “‘Boom It in Ya Jeep’: Low-end Theories of Black Aurality in 90’s NYC Hip-Hop”

Moderator: Oliver Wang


Speakers
PR

Patrick Rivers

Patrick Rivers is a doctoral student in ethnomusicology at The Graduate Center, CUNY completing a dissertation on hip-hop production entitled The Mad Science of Hip-Hop: History, Technology, and Poetics of Hip-Hop’s Music. He is also a contributor to WNYC’s music talk show Soundcheck.   Abstract: | | "Rumble in the Concrete Jungle: Beat Battles in NYC and Their Impact on Hip-Hop Production" With New York City bearing... Read More →
avatar for Shante Paradigm Smalls

Shante Paradigm Smalls

Shanté Paradigm Smalls is the Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow/Visiting Assistant Professor in English at Davidson College. She is working on her book Hip Hop Heresies: New York City’s Queer Interraciality, 1975-2005. Smalls is a member of hip-hop group, B.Q.E., and starred in the hip-hop documentary Pick Up The Mic. |   | Abstract: | | "'Voices Carry': Queer Dissonance and the Travel of NYC 1980s Hip-Hop Sound" | This paper... Read More →
CT

Chris Tabron

Chris Tabron is a record producer and audio engineer, as well as the founder of The Axis Collective. He has worked with a wide array of artists including Jason Mraz, Robin Thicke, Death Cab for Cutie, Mike Posner, Japanese Voyeurs, and Gordon Voidwell. A Ph.D. candidate at New York University’s Department of Music, his doctoral work focuses on New York hip-hop production between 1989 and 1999.   Abstract: | | "'Boom It in Ya... Read More →
OW

Oliver Wang

Oliver Wang is assistant professor of Sociology at California State University-Long Beach. He contributes regularly to NPR and the LA Times and runs the audio-blog, Soul-Sides.com.   Abstract: | | "The The ? Remains: Toward a Culture-Emergent Hip-Hop Studies" Of all forms of popular music, hip-hop is arguably the most explicit in its claims to constituting a distinctive and coherent “culture”. Yet – paradoxically... Read More →


Sunday March 25, 2012 2:15pm - 3:45pm
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

2:15pm

Roundtable: I Pledge Allegiance to the Block: Cityscapes, Hegemonic Sound, and Blackness

Whether a homesite for protest and resistance or, as Alain Locke suggests, an escape from the ‘medieval’ south, the city serves as both a muse and haven for black American cultural expression. Although cityscapes are heavily represented in African American music and popular culture, more discussion is needed about how the city is often a hegemonic space of black cultural expression. In other words, how does an urban setting dictate power and blackness in the (African) American community?

With: Regina Bradley, Fredara Hadley, Matthew Morrison, and Liana Silva

Moderator: Guthrie “Guy” Ramsey


Speakers
RB

Regina Bradley

Regina N. Bradley is a PhD candidate in African American Literature at Florida State University. Her dissertation analyzes white hegemonic privilege and race consciousness in 21st century African American literature and culture. She regularly writes for AllHipHop, Sounding Out!, and PopMatters.   Abstract: | | "I Pledge Allegiance to the Block: City-scapes, Hegemonic Sound, and Blackness" Urban social-cultural landscapes serve as an... Read More →
FM

Fredara Mareva Hadley

Fredara Mareva Hadley is an ethnomusicologist with a research focus on music scenes and African American popular music. Her dissertation examines how the soul music scene in Atlanta, Georgia contributed to intra-racial diversity. In addition to academic pursuits, Fredara is an active contributor to Okayplayer.com and PopMatters.com. Abstract: "I Pledge Allegiance to the Block: City-scapes, Hegemonic Sound, and Blackness" Urban... Read More →
MD

Matthew D. Morrison

Matthew D. Morrison is a PhD candidate in Musicology at Columbia University. He completed a masters in Musicology at The Catholic University of America. He is currently the Editor-in-Chief of Current Musicology, an adjunct instructor of black music at Vassar College, and writing a dissertation on the intersections between sound and race.   Abstract: | | "I Pledge Allegiance to the Block: City-scapes, Hegemonic Sound, and Blackness" Urban... Read More →
GG

Guthrie "Guy" Ramsey

Guthrie “Guy” Ramsey, PhD is the Edmund J. and Louise W. Kahn Term Professor of Music at the University of Pennsylvania. His book Race Music: Black Cultures From Be-Bop to Hip Hop (University of California Press, 2003) was named outstanding book of the year by IASPM-US. He recently completed work on a book on jazz pianist Bud Powell titled In Walked Bud: Earl Bud Powell and the Modern Jazz Challenge.   Abstract: | | "I... Read More →
LS

Liana Silva

Liana M. Silva is a PhD candidate in Binghamton University’s English Department and Managing Editor for the sound studies blog Sounding Out! She is currently working on her dissertation, a study of representations of New York City and the idea of home in the cultural productions of African-Americans and Puerto Ricans.   Abstract: | | "I Pledge Allegiance to the Block: City-scapes, Hegemonic Sound, and Blackness" Urban... Read More →


Sunday March 25, 2012 2:15pm - 3:45pm
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

2:15pm

Urban Ears

Sonnet Retman, “Muddy the Waters: Other Stories of Love and Theft in the Making of the Delta Blues”

David Suisman, “The Urban Ear of Tony Schwartz”

Franklin Bruno, “Who Put the Arrow in ‘Cupid’? Hugo and Luigi’s Schlock ‘n’ Soul”

Moderator: Greil Marcus


Speakers
FB

Franklin Bruno

Franklin Bruno is the author of Armed Forces, in Continuum’s 33 1/3 series; he is currently writing a book on popular song-form for Wesleyan University Press. His criticism has appeared in The Nation, Oxford American, The Believer, and two editions of Da Capo’s Best Music Writing annual. He has released 14 albums of original songs since 1990, solo and with the bands Nothing Painted Blue and (currently) Human Hearts. His most recent... Read More →
GM

Greil Marcus

Greil Marcus is the author of, most recently, The Doors: A Lifetime of Listening to Five Mean Years and Bob Dylan by Greil Marcus: Writings 1968-2010. With Werner Sollors he is the editor of A New Literary History of America, published by Harvard in 2009.   Abstract: | | "'Maybe Someday Your Name Will Be in Lights': Robert Johnson Takes the City" The great producer John Hammond referred to Robert Johnson as a primitive blues singer... Read More →
SR

Sonnet Retman

Sonnet Retman teaches African American literature and culture at the University of Washington and she is the author of Real Folks: Race and Genre in the Great Depression (Duke 2011).   Abstract: | | "Muddy the Waters: Other Stories of Love and Theft in the Making of the Delta Blues" This presentation begins with simple question: while Alan Lomax, the white folklorist who collected the blues and so many other folk genres may be a... Read More →
DS

David Suisman

David Suisman is associate professor of history at the University of Delaware. His is author of Selling Sounds: The Commercial Revolution in American Music recipient of numerous awards and honors (including honorable mention for IASPM-US’s Woody Guthrie Prize) and co-editor of Sound in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction. He is also associate editor of the Journal for Popular Music Studies and a sometime disc jockey at... Read More →


Sunday March 25, 2012 2:15pm - 3:45pm
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

2:15pm

Transitional New York

Shana Goldin-Perschbacher, “Sincerity in the City: Transnational Musical Collaboration Post 9/11”

Oyebade Dosunmu, “Lagos, New York City and Transnational Afrobeat Culture”

Deborah Pacini Hernandez, “Bachata, New York Style”

Moderator: Gayle Wald


Speakers
OD

Oyebade Dosunmu

Oyebade Dosunmu holds a PhD in ethnomusicology and a certificate in African studies from the University of Pittsburgh. He has delivered papers at international conferences, and is currently editing two anthologies of African music. His research interests include music and politics, and transnationalism in music. Oyebade teaches at the University of Pittsburgh.   Abstract: | | "Lagos, New York City and Transnational Afrobeat... Read More →
SG

Shana Goldin-Perschbacher

Shana Goldin-Perschbacher (Ph.D. 2008 UVA) is Stanford’s first Queer Studies Postdoc, was a Mellon Fellow, and taught LGBTS at Yale. She theorizes identity and affect through analysis of sonic, visual, film, and social media and is writing Sincerely Queer: Musical Gender Transgression at the Turn of the Millennium.   Abstract: | | "Sincerity in the City: Transnational Musical Collaboration Post 9/11" Sincerity is an unlikely... Read More →
DP

Deborah Pacini Hernandez

Deborah Pacini Hernandez, Professor of Anthropology, Tufts University, is author of Oye Como Va!: Hybridity and Identity in Latin/o Popular Music; Bachata: A Social History of a Dominican Popular Music; and co-editor of Reggaeton (Duke University Press); and Rockin’ Las Americas: The Global Politics of Rock in Latin/o America.   Abstract: | | "Bachata, New York style" Dominican bachata, a guitar-based genre characterized by... Read More →
GW

Gayle Wald

Gayle Wald is writing a book on the TV show Soul! She teaches at George Washington University and is the author of Shout, Sister, Shout!, a biography of Rosetta Tharpe.   Abstract: | | "'Deliver De Letter': 'Please Mr. Postman,' the Marvelettes, and the Afro-Caribbean Imaginary" Berry Gordy touted Motown as the “Sound of Young America,” thereby insisting that black sounds—specifically the sounds of African American... Read More →


Sunday March 25, 2012 2:15pm - 3:45pm
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

2:15pm

A Girl’s Guide to the Urban Imaginary

Elizabeth Keenan, “Out in the Streets: 1960s Girl Groups and the Imagined Urban Space of New York City”

Sarah Dougher,“Making Noise in the Safe Space: How Girls’ Rock Camps Make Place in the City”

Diane Pecknold, “The Spectral Cityscapes of Tween Pop”

Moderator: Jacqueline Warwick


Speakers
SD

Sarah Dougher

Sarah Dougher is an educator and musician living in Portland Oregon. She teaches courses on gender, music, poetry and women’s history at Portland State University. She also volunteers at the Rock ‘n’ Roll Camp for girls, writes choral music, and is working on a book about tweens and music.   Abstract: | | "Making Noise in the Safe Space: How Girls' Rock Camps Make Place in the City" Girls’ rock camps were... Read More →
EK

Elizabeth Keenan

Elizabeth K. Keenan completed her doctorate at Columbia University in 2008 with a dissertation on feminist politics, popular music, and the American middle class. Her work has received the Wong Tolbert and Lise Waxer Prizes from the Society for Ethnomusicology and has been published in Women & Music, JPMS, and Current Musicology. She teaches at Fordham University and Columbia University.   Abstract: | | "Out in the Streets: 1960s Girl... Read More →
DP

Diane Pecknold

Diane Pecknold is an Assistant Professor of Women’s and Gender Studies at the University of Louisville, where she teaches popular culture and feminist studies. She is the author of The Selling Sound: The Rise of the Country Music Industry and co-editor of A Boy Named Sue: Gender and Country Music.   Abstract: | | "The Spectral Cityscapes of Tween Pop" The city of the adult pop and rock imaginary is a place of heterogeneity... Read More →


Sunday March 25, 2012 2:15pm - 3:45pm
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

4:00pm

Roundtable: These Are the Breaks: How a Few Dozen Obscure Records Transformed the World of Pop Music

A select group of sounds familiar only to a small group of folks within a few square miles in the Bronx of the mid-1970s became the rhythmic foundation of global pop music for the next two decades. How and why did this convergence of urban geography and music history happen? And what were the consequences?

With: Kool DJ Red Alert, Nick deKreshewo, Bill Stephney, and Brian Coleman

Moderator: Dan Charnas


Speakers
KD

Kool DJ Red Alert

DJ Red Alert, one of Afrika Bambaataa’s original Zulu Nation DJs, is one of the founding fathers of Hip-Hop music and culture. He was named one of the 50 most influential people in music by Rolling Stone, and is featured in the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame.   Abstract: | | "These Are The Breaks: How a few dozen obscure records transformed the world of pop music" As the legend goes, the children of The Bronx in the 1970s... Read More →
DC

Dan Charnas

Dan Charnas, author of The Big Payback: The History of the Business of Hip-Hop (Penguin), is also the co-author of Def Jam: The First 25 Years of the Last Great Record Label (Rizzoli). He was VP of A&R for Rick Rubin’s American Recordings and wrote for The Source magazine.   Abstract: | | "These Are The Breaks: How a few dozen obscure records transformed the world of pop music" As the legend goes, the children of The Bronx in... Read More →
BC

Brian Coleman

Brian Coleman is the author of Check the Technique: Liner Notes for Hip-Hop Junkies (Random House/Villard). He has written for Scratch, URB, Wax Poetics, CMJ, Complex, Boston Herald, Boston Phoenix, XXL, The Source, and NY Press, among others.   Abstract: | | "These Are The Breaks: How a few dozen obscure records transformed the world of pop music" As the legend goes, the children of The Bronx in the 1970s couldn’t afford... Read More →
ND

Nick deKreshewo

Nick deKreshewo is the founder of Downstairs Records in Manhattan. A specialist in rare 45-rpm records, DeKreshewo transformed Downstairs Records in the 1970s and 1980s into the unofficial home of breakbeats, and continues operating Downstairs Records as an Internet and mail-order business.   Abstract: | | "These Are The Breaks: How a few dozen obscure records transformed the world of pop music" As the legend goes, the children of The... Read More →
BS

Bill Stephney

Bill Stephney was the first president of Def Jam Recordings and the co-founder and co-producer of the legendary group Public Enemy. Stephney was music supervisor for a number of major motion pictures including Boomerang, CB-4, The Ladies Man, and Clockers.   Abstract: | | "These Are The Breaks: How a few dozen obscure records transformed the world of pop music" As the legend goes, the children of The Bronx in the 1970s couldn’t... Read More →


Sunday March 25, 2012 4:00pm - 6:00pm
Rosenthal Pavilion, 10th Floor 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY

4:00pm

Los Angeles

Barney Hoskyns, “The City That Celebrates Itself: Los Angeles on Los Angeles”

Ken Tucker, “L.A. Eccentricity in the 1970s: Thomas Jefferson Kaye, Hirth Martinez, and Moon Martin”

Robert Fink, “’This Is Los Angeles’:  Sampling the Urban Jungle with Tom Brokaw (and Friends)”

Moderator: Tim Riley


Speakers
RF

Robert Fink

Robert Fink is Professor and Chair of Musicology at UCLA. He focuses on music after 1965, with special interests in minimalism, popular music, post-modernism, and music in Los Angeles. Ongoing projects include a study of the politics of classical music after the canon, tentatively titled DeClassified; and an edited collection on tone and timbre in popular music.   Abstract: | | "'This Is Los Angeles': Sampling the Urban Jungle with Tom... Read More →
BH

Barney Hoskyns

Barney Hoskyns co-founded and editorially directs the online music-journalism library Rock’s Backpages. He is the author of, among other books, Waiting for the Sun: Strange Days, Weird Scenes & the Sound of Los Angeles (1996), Hotel California: Singer-Songwriters & Cocaine Cowboys in the LA Canyons (2006) and the Tom Waits biography Lowside of the Road (2009). He lives in East Sheen, southwest London.   Abstract: | | "The... Read More →
TR

Tim Riley

NPR critic and author Tim Riley\'s fifth book is a major new biography of John Ono Lennon (Hyperion, 2011). He was Critic in Residence at Brown University in 2008, and teaches digital and music journalism at Emerson College in Boston.
KT

Ken Tucker

Ken Tucker has worked, chronologically, at The Los Angeles Herald-Examiner, The Philadelphia Inquirer, and Entertainment Weekly. He is music critic for NPR’s “Fresh Air with Terry Gross” and author of the Steely Dan chapter of the first edition of The Rolling Stone: Illustrated History of Rock and Roll edited by Jim Miller, subsequently deleted from later editions.   Abstract: | | "L.A. Eccentricity in the 1970s... Read More →


Sunday March 25, 2012 4:00pm - 6:00pm
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

4:00pm

New Orleans

Ben Sandmel, “Ernie K-Doe: The R&B Emperor of New Orleans (“Mother-In-Law,” “Ma-Naughahyde,” and Grassroots Surrealism)”

Larry Blumenfeld, “Treme and the Abstract Truth: Fact and Fiction in New Orleans”

Zarah Ersoff, “Treme’s Aural Verisimilitude”

Shawn Macomber, “We Hated God BEFORE the Storm: New Orleans Sludge Metal in the Post-Katrina Years”

Moderator: Blake Leyh


Speakers
LB

Larry Blumenfeld

  Abstract: | | ""Treme" and the Abstract Truth: Fact and Fiction in New Orleans" In Sidney Bechet’s memoir, “Treat It Gentle,” the late clarinetist’s real grandfather is supplanted by Omar, a made-up figure based on a folk tale, to convey truths about jazz in New Orleans. David Simon’s HBO series “Treme” is fiction, drawn from fact. That approach best serves the surreality of New Orleans, especially since the 2005 flood... Read More →
ZE

Zarah Ersoff

Zarah Ersoff is a PhD candidate in Musicology at UCLA. Her dissertation examines the relationship between musicality, aestheticism and Orientalism in Erik Satie, Maurice Ravel and Reynaldo Hahn. Her broader research interests include nineteenth- and twentieth-century opera, queer and feminist theories, and film and television music. She has given past talks on topics as diverse as glam rock movie-musicals, the politics and aesthetics of... Read More →
BL

Blake Leyh

Blake Leyh is a composer, music supervisor, music producer, and sound designer. His credits include films by James Cameron, The Coen Brothers, Spike Lee, Ang Lee, John Waters, Jonathan Demme, and Julie Taymor. Leyh was the music supervisor for all five seasons of HBO\'s acclaimed series The Wire, and is the music supervisor for David Simon\'s New Orleans series Treme. He has composed scores for more than twenty feature films, including many... Read More →
avatar for Shawn Macomber

Shawn Macomber

Fangoria
Shawn Macomber is a South Florida-based writer whose work has appeared in Fangoria, Decibel, Magnet, Rue Morgue, Maxim, the Wall Street Journal, Reason, Radar, Yankee, The Weekly Standard, and the Los Angeles Times, among other fine and middling publications.
BS

Ben Sandmel

Ben Sandmel is a New Orleans-based journalist, folklorist, drummer, and producer. His published work includes a book about zydeco and a forthcoming biography of Ernie K-Doe . Sandmel has produced and played on albums including Boogie Bill Webb’s Drinkin’ & Stinkin’, and The Hackberry Ramblers’ Grammy-nominated Deep Water.   Abstract: | | "Ernie K-Doe: The R&B Emperor of New Orleans ('Mother-In-Law... Read More →


Sunday March 25, 2012 4:00pm - 6:00pm
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

4:00pm

Modern English

Julia Sneeringer, “’I’d Never Even Been to Manchester’: Liverpool Musicians in Hamburg’s Entertainment Economy, 1960-1965”

Leonard Nevarez, “How Joy Division Came to Sound like Manchester” 

Lucy O’Brien, “’Can I Have a Taste of Your Ice Cream?’ (Postpunk Feminism and the Yorkshire Ripper)”

Gillian Gower, “Riot Culture: Beats, Banksy, and the Bristol Sound”

Moderator: Devin McKinney


Speakers
GG

Gillian Gower

Gillian Gower is a PhD student in UCLA’s Department of Musicology. Her research interests include the contextual interplay between affect and politics that contributes to the aesthetics of unique musical subcultures, or scenes, from 14th-century France to present-day England.   Abstract: | | "Riot Culture: Beats, Banksy, and the Bristol Sound" Civil disobedience is something of an established tradition in Bristol; the term... Read More →
DM

Devin McKinney

Devin McKinney is the author of Magic Circles: The Beatles in Dream and History (Harvard, 2003) and The Man who Saw a Ghost: The Life and Times of Henry Fonda (St. Martin’s, forthcoming Fall 2012). He has written for The Village Voice, The American Prospect, The Guardian, Film Quarterly, The Oxford American, and others. He lives in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, and is completing a master’s degree in library science and archiving.
LN

Leonard Nevarez

Leonard Nevarez is a professor of sociology at Vassar College and the author of Pursuing Quality of Life (Routledge, 2011) and New Money, Nice Town (Routledge, 2003). He blogs at musicalurbanism.blogspot.com.   Abstract: | | "How Joy Division came to sound like Manchester" Joy Division means many things to attentive listeners, including a vicarious journey through Manchester, England, at a bygone era of industrial decline and political... Read More →
LO

Lucy O'Brien

Writer/broadcaster Lucy O’Brien wrote She Bop 1 and II, a history of women in popular music (1995 & 2002), with a third edition due next year. She has also published in-depth biographies including Madonna: Like An Icon (2007) and Dusty (2000). Her paper is drawn from a recently published piece in Vol 1 of the journal Punk & Post Punk. She is Lecturer in Music Journalism at Epsom University of Creative Arts, UK.   Abstract... Read More →
JS

Julia Sneeringer

Julia Sneeringer is Associate Professor of History at Queens College and the CUNY Graduate Center. This paper is part of a work-in-progress on the social history of the early rock and roll scene and the entertainment economy in Hamburg, West Germany. Her earlier work (Winning Women’s Votes, UNC Press 2002) explored political propaganda for women voters, as well as gender and advertising, in Weimar Germany.   Abstract: | | "'I'd... Read More →


Sunday March 25, 2012 4:00pm - 6:00pm
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

4:00pm

Roundtable: All Internet Is Local? The Meaning Of “Local Music Coverage” In The Pageview Era

How can editors balance the demands for revenue-generating pageviews and the idea of serving their local communities? Should musicians go the shock-tactic route and try to become memes in an effort to transcend their geographic standing? Is the Internet becoming its own “local scene”? The panelists heading up this roundtable are journalists from markets large and small who have had weary showdowns with Google Analytics, but we encourage all those interested in the current state of local scenes to enter the fray.

With: Reed Fischer, David Malitz, Andrea Swensson, Christopher Weingarten, and Ryan White

Moderator: Maura Johnston


Speakers
RF

Reed Fischer

Reed Fischer is the music editor at City Pages in Minneapolis. Previously, he spent two years as the New Times Broward-Palm Beach music editor in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, and he has written for Rolling Stone, Village Voice, Alternative Press, CMJ, among others.   Abstract: | | "All Internet Is Local? The Meaning Of "Local Music Coverage" In The Pageview Era" The media world's ever-speedier shift toward online content—particularly... Read More →
MJ

Maura Johnston

Maura Johnston is the music editor of the Village Voice, where she runs the blog Sound of the City. A self-professed Internet lifer, her work on music, technology, and culture has appeared at NPR, Newsday, Vanity Fair, Popdust, and The Daily.   Abstract: | | "All Internet Is Local? The Meaning Of "Local Music Coverage" In The Pageview Era" The media world's ever-speedier shift toward online content—particularly the accompanying... Read More →
AS

Andrea Swensson

Andrea Swensson is the music editor of City Pages and has been covering Minnesota music actively since 2005. She's the writer behind most of the paper's music-related cover stories and their annual Picked to Click and Year in Music issues, and she also works daily on the Gimme Noise music blog. As a freelancer, she has contributed to SPIN.com and the Star Tribune, and she created the online music mag Reveille Magazine with a crew of other... Read More →
CR

Christopher R. Weingarten

Christopher R. Weingarten is Senior Editor at Spin. His work has appeared in The Village Voice (where he pens the twice-weekly local-music column Yes In My Backyard), Revolver, Nylon, RollingStone.com and elsewhere. He is the author of two books: a study of Public Enemy's iconic It Takes A Nation Of Millions To Hold Us Back (via Continuum) and the adorable social anthropology study Hipster Puppies (via NAL/Penguin).   Abstract: | | "All... Read More →


Sunday March 25, 2012 4:00pm - 6:00pm
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

4:00pm

Contact Zones

José Esteban Muñoz, “Calling Up Thunder: The Gun Club and the Punk Rock Commons”

Tim Lawrence, “Networking and Contact: Competing Forms of Queerness on the New York Dance Floor, 1980-88”

Jack Halberstam, “Losing Control: Grace Jones vs. Joy Division”

Alexandra T. Vazquez, “Swamp Things: The Viscosity of the Miami Sound”

Moderator: Christine Bacareza Balance


Speakers
CB

Christine Bacareza Balance

Christine Bacareza Balance is Assistant Professor in Asian American Studies at UC Irvine. Her writing has appeared in Women & Performance, the Journal of Asian American Studies (JAAS), and the Journal of Popular Music Studies (JPMS). A member of the band The Jack Lords Orchestra, she is currently writing a book on popular music and performance in post-World War II Filipino America.   Abstract: | | "Pinoise Rock" In 1998, the first... Read More →
JH

Jack Halberstam

Jack Halberstam is the author of four books including Female Masculinity (Duke UP, 1998) and most recently The Queer Art of Failure (Duke UP, 2011). Halberstam just finished a book for Beacon Press titled Gaga Feminism: Sex, Gender and the End of Normal due out in Fall 2012. Halberstam blogs at bullybloggers.com   Abstract: | | "Losing Control: Grace Jones vs. Joy Division" Grace Jones is queer in every way and in her performative... Read More →
TL

Tim Lawrence

Tim Lawrence is the author of Love Saves the Day: A History of American Dance Music Culture, 1970-79 and Hold On to Your Dreams: Arthur Russell and the Downtown Music Scene, 1973-92. He is a founding member of the Centre for Cultural Studies Research and Lucky Cloud Sound System.   Abstract: | | "Networking and Contact: Competing Forms of Queerness on the New York Dance Floor, 1980-88"  In Times Square Red, Times Square... Read More →
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Jose Esteban Munoz

José Esteban Muñoz is a Professor of Performance Studies at Tisch School of the Arts, New York University. He is the author Disidentifications: Queers of Color and the Performance of Politics (1999), Cruising Utopia: The Here and Now of Queer Futurity (2009) and the forthcoming The Sense of Brown. He co-edits the book series Sexual Cultures for NYU Press.   Abstract: | | "Calling Up Thunder: The Gun Club and the Punk Rock... Read More →
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Alexandra T. Vazquez

Alexandra T. Vazquez is an assistant professor in the Center for African American Studies and the Department of English at Princeton University. She is the author of Listening in Detail: Performances of Cuban Music and, with Ela Troyano, a coeditor of La Lupe: Queen of Latin Soul. She has published in women and performance, The Journal for Popular Music Studies, Social Text, and the books Reggaeton and Pop When the World Falls... Read More →


Sunday March 25, 2012 4:00pm - 6:00pm
NYU’s Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for University Life (KC) 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012

6:15pm

Conference Closing Keynote- Put The Needle On The Record:
Diggin’ In The Crates with ?uestlove

Ahmir “?uestlove” Thompson loves his many jobs, from leading the Roots band on late-night TV to producing a hot list of current and heritage artists, not to mention his regular DJ gig at Brooklyn Bowl and drumming on stage for Jay-Z. But there’s one thing that really lights up his days and nights: talking about his favorite records. Known for his copious vinyl collection, ?uestlove can geek out with the best of ’em. On a weekend full of geek-outs, we’re gonna geek out with ?uestlove, and talk records, talk collecting: special vinyl moments, our first, our best, our ones that got away.

Moderator: Harry Weinger


Speakers
avatar for ?uestlove

?uestlove

?uestlove is the unmistakable heartbeat of The Roots, Philadelphia’s most influential hip-hop band. Beyond that, this Grammy award-winning musician\'s indisputable reputation has landed him musical directing positions with everyone from D\'Angelo to Eminem to Jay-Z. He is the Musical Director for Late Night with Jimmy Fallon and his beloved Roots crew serves as house band.
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Harry Weinger

Universal Music Enterprises



Sunday March 25, 2012 6:15pm - 7:30pm
Rosenthal Pavilion, 10th Floor 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY

7:30pm

AFTER HOURS: Concert Performance of Vidas Perfectas

Following a lunch session preview, the performers of Vidas Perfectas bring two episodes in a full concert version. Directed by Alex Waterman, this all-new Spanish-language version of Robert Ashley’s landmark work Perfect Lives (1977-1983) features Ned Sublette, Elio Villafranca, Peter Gordon, Elisa Santiago, and Abraham Gómez Delgado, in the roles originally performed by Robert Ashley, “Blue” Gene Tyranny, Peter Gordon, Jill Kroesen and David van Tieghem, respectively.


Speakers
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Abraham Gomez Delgado

Abraham Gomez-Delgado is a composer, multi-instrumentalist, vocalist and performance artist of Peruvian descent. A native of Puerto Rico, he now leads the experimental Latin music group Zemog el Gallo Bueno, co-leads the Positive Catastrophe and has a performance art group named Eje in the US. He teaches sound art and production at Bloomfield College, New Jersey and was recently awarded the New Jazz Works grant from Chamber Music America and... Read More →
PG

Peter Gordon

Peter Gordon first gained attention in New York in the late 1970s with his Love of Life Orchestra (LOLO). He has composed large-scale scores for collaborations in theater, dance, film and video, including Robert Ashley’s Perfect Lives. His recordings include Star Jaws, Extended Niceties, Geneva, Casino, Innocent and Brooklyn, Leningrad Express, Love of Life Orchestra: Quartet, The Yellow Box (with David Cunningham) and the retrospective... Read More →
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Elisa Santiago

Elisa Santiago danced professionally in Spain for several years before receiving her BA in choreography at The School for New Dance Development in Amsterdam in 2003. There she met Voin de Voin, with whom she made performance installation pieces under the name of Kangaroo Productions Presents. Their collaboration involved other artists and several media. Their work was presented at Ellen de Bruijne Gallery (Amsterdam), Frascati Theater... Read More →
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Ned Sublette

Ned Sublette is a singer-songwriter and author. He has published three books: Cuba and Its Music: From the First Drums to the Mambo, The World that Made New Orleans: From Spanish Silver to Congo Square, and The Year Before the Flood. His albums include Kiss You Down South (forthcoming), Cowboy Rumba (Palm Pictures) and, in collaboration with Lawrence Weiner, Monsters from the Deep and Ships at Sea, Sailors and Shoes... Read More →
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Elio Villafranca

Elio Villafranca was classically trained in percussion and composition at the Instituto Superior de Arte in Havana, Cuba before his arrival in the U.S. in late 1995. Resident professor at Temple University, he is at the forefront of the latest generation of remarkable Cuban pianists, composers and bandleaders making major creative contributions to the international development of modern jazz. He has released three albums as a bandleader, most... Read More →


Sunday March 25, 2012 7:30pm - 8:45pm
(Le) Poisson Rouge 158 Bleecker Street, New York, NY 10012